Welcome to StuttgartDNA’s 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide.  We will cover the 991.1-gen Porsche 911 in a subsequent Buyer Guide.

But in this 991.2-gen edition of our Buyer Guide series, first we give you historical perspective — the 991’s genetic underpinnings, and it’s subtle yet significant evolution as the seventh-generation Porsche 911.

Next we turn to model-specific features and essentials regarding just about every trim line of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911.

Finally, we draw to a close with concluding thoughts on the 991 generation of the Porsche 911.

So let’s get started.

Navigable 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide

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Table of Contents / Outline

Introduction to StuttgartDNA’s 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Essentials

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Model-Year Features

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991-gen Porsche 911 Concluding Thoughts


Introduction to StuttgartDNA’s 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide

Well.  Porsche did it again.

How does one successfully update a globally branded icon while at the same time pacifying the Porsche marque’s loyal devotees as well as its über-purists?

Answer:  Porsche accomplished its mission in advancing the cumulative 901-through-997 lineage into the highly anticipated 991 — now recognized as the highly successful 50-year development of the seventh generation of immortal Porsche 901.  No mere walk in the park for Porsche AG, this.

So how, exactly, did Porsche do it?

Ever since launching the first Porsche 356 way back in the late Forties, Porsche has constantly pushed the envelope of automotive design, performance and excellence.  This enabled Porsche year in and year out to captivate countless legions of Porschephiles, young and old, round the world.

Roadblocks to development have always provoked Porsche on to evolutionary innovation.  Overcoming obstacles has always been the mother of invention for Porsche.  Porsche’s many, many milestones of genetic advancement epitomize Porsche’s design and engineering prowess.

Impediments in this specific case of phasing out the 997-gen 911 and incubating the 991-gen 911 proved formidable.  Here were just some of the most prominent examples:

  • Persistent grumblings ever since the respective launches of the water-cooled “New Generation” Porsche 996-gen 911 and Porsche 997-gen 911
  • Porsche’s relentless pursuit to eke out the fastest world-class track-time records possible
  • The relentless tide of growing global gas-mileage and emissions regulations

While you can probably come up with additional “necessities” that sowed the seeds of the 991’s genesis, the three foregoing obstacles are probably the most challenging and revelatory.

991-Gen Historical Perspective

In order to understand the origins of the 991 better, we need to examine what came before in the context of the historical whys and wherefores of the next-generation 911, the 991-gen models.

We at StuttgartDNA feel that if you do not have a sense of what came before the current model generation in question, then it will difficult to understand and digest the evolutionary improvements that the present generation affords you.

As you’ll come to realize when perusing any one of our StuttgartDNA Buyer Guides, here is where we strive to give you the essential backstory of the “generation” that you wish to study.

Blow-Back Against the “New Generation”

That Water-Cooling Heresy of Heresies

As you may recall, Porsche über-purists took to brandishing torches and pitchforks upon learning of the launch of the “New Generation” Porsche 911s at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Staunch traditionalist followers of Porsche orthodoxy deemed it the ultimate heresy that Porsche would even think of introducing a water-cooled engine for the iconic 911.  This colossal sacrilege fomented unprecedented discontent all throughout this tumultuous historical period.

But there was calculated method to Porsche AG’s seemingly unforgivable madness.  As presented in greater detail in my 996-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide, the underpinnings of the “New Generation” Porsche 911s consisted of the following hypothesis:

Transitioning to a water-cooled flat-six would not only enable greater engine power and performance than any air-cooled engine ever could in the near and distant future, but also better address the impending and progressively more draconian CAFE regulations dawning on the twenty-first-century horizon.

Yes, the introduction of a 911 water-cooled engine paved the way for greater leeway in prospective increases in power and performance.  But, most important of all, the New Generation notions and radical change in direction in the immediate term would also save the Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen company from imminent financial ruin.

The Dreaded IMS and RMS Blunders

Nonetheless, like most embryonic endeavors, the “New Generation” models did exhibit their own strain of “growing pains.”  Chief among these problems were the Intermediate Shaft (IMS) and Rear Main Seal (RMS) engine snafus that have been discussed ad infinitum on Porsche forums all across the Internet.

These egregious problems were inherently characteristic of the early Mezger M96 engines.

The RMS’s incontinence infirmity and the far-more-serious IMS imbroglio did not cross-contaminate later editions of the 997.  Yet these troubling quandaries continued to cast long paranoid shadows across that final iteration of the New Generation models.

(Since these engine glitches are not within the scope of this Buyer Guide, please see our discussions of the IMS and RMS disorders in our 996-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide for more definitive information on these engine woes.)

Once and for all, though, the 991’s newly engineered A91 and A92 engines completely flushed away the nasty IMS and RMS taint of the last two previous 911’s 996-gen M96 engines and 997-gen M96 and M97 engines.

 “Hyper-CAFEinating”

In its modern role as a high-performance sports-car manufacturer, Porsche is always swimming against the relentless tide of mounting global mileage and emissions regulations.  What emerged from the seismic sea change of switching over to a water-cooled engine that reverberated across the Porsche Cosmos was this:

In general, water-cooling spawned the unprecedented ability to roll with the blows of ever-increasing MPG regulation and global-emissions regulation.  In particular, water-cooling allowed the 991-gen Porsche 911 to meet and exceed previous and existing MPG and emissions regulations barriers.

By quipping about “Hyper-CAFEinating” in the title of this section, I am alluding to the inexorable need to bow to increasing MPG standards, as well as to skyrocketing global emissions regulation.  CAFE regulations are probably the most onerous of all global regulations.

CAFE stands for Corporate Average Fuel Economy relative to establishing and enforcing MPG (miles per gallon) consumption standards.  Wikipedia summarizes CAFE standards in general as follows:

“The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards are regulations in the United States, first enacted by the United States Congress in 1975,[1] after the 1973–74 Arab Oil Embargo, to improve the average fuel economy of cars and light trucks (trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles) produced for sale in the United States.  They are set by the Secretary of Transportation.”

While water-cooling is indeed a disturbing vestige — especially to Porsche traditionalists — of the early stages of the “New Generation” era, it afforded further development of the 991-gen Porsche 911 no longer possible with revered air-cooled engines.

These technological breakthroughs enabled Porsche to sidestep as well as overcome the U.S.A.’s draconian CAFE standards that continue coming down the pike to this day.  These and other realized Porsche advances will be further identified and illuminated throughout this Buyer Guide below.

The 991’s Launch

The 991 generation of the Porsche 911 Carrera debuted at the 2011 IAA Frankfurt Motor Show in Germany.  This was the debutante’s ball for a brand-new generation of the Porsche 911 in close to a decade.  Porsche wanted to establish this debut as a milestone worthy of such an introduction of the latest iteration to take the company’s flagship 911 to the next evolutionary level.

So what is the significance of that particular choice of date and venue for the unveiling of the 991-gen 911 Carrera?

Porsche chose to introduce the 991-gen Porsche 911 in 2011 in Frankfurt because this date happened to occur exactly 48 years after the IAA Frankfurt Motor Show introduction of the Porsche 901 in 1963 —what became the very first Porsche 911.

The significance and impact of these intersecting debuts can be found in the steady genetic evolution that has taken place ever since the genesis of the 901.

Porsche AG reported the following to the automotive press about the 991-gen Porsche 911:  “The completely redesigned generation of the sports car icon is stepping into the limelight with its flat, stretched silhouette, exciting contours and precisely designed details, yet from the very first glance it remains unmistakably a 911.”

Porsche AG went further to announce with much ballyhoo that:

  • almost 90 percent of the 991’s components came from entirely new designs or had undergone significant further development
  • an approximately 3.9-inch (100 mm) longer wheelbase and reduced height made for a more muscular silhouette
  • the new lightweight body is a state-of-the-art aluminum-steel composite, reducing weight of the exiting 997 by almost 100 pounds (45 kg) — despite a significantly greater body rigidity

So let’s take that deep dive into the marvelous gene pool of the 991 generation, shall we…?

991 First Impressions

But Does It Still Truly Resemble a Porsche 911?

Porsche’s newly introduced 991-gen 911 has been completely redesigned inside and out, relative to its immediate exiting predecessor, the 997.

Yet, despite these substantial intergenerational changes, the 991-gen Porsche 911 faithfully conforms with traditional genetic Porsche formsprache (i.e., Porsche design language).  That is, it conveys typical Porsche 911 “power and elegance,” as aptly described by Porsche AG at the time.

One man among a few hand-picked others had a firm hand in ensuring that the basic design language of the 991-gen 911 kept in strict compliance with Porsche formsprache.  He was supervising engineer August Achleitner, no stranger to the envelope-pushing ways of Weissach and its GT cars division.

Yet Mr. Achleitner realized at the time of the 991’s gestation that this was yet another timely opportunity that comes but once a decade or so to nurture and sculpt the next-generation Porsche 911.

“With the 991, we introduced a new platform [which] always gives a chance to do changes, bigger changes that are usually not possible because of cost investment reasons,” Mr. Achleitner acknowledged.

Bold New Look and Feel

The Porsche 991 has a 3.9 inch-longer wheelbase and a reduced height that presents a more chiseled, muscular physique.  The 991’s wide-arched wings accentuate the 7th-generation 991’s wider front track.

Newly designed exterior side mirrors now find themselves on the upper-front of the doors.  They are no longer where they have been for recent past generations, i.e., on the mirror triangle just above the top of the door.  Two advantages:  1) slipperier aerodynamics and 2) a sleeker, wider visual impression.

In short, the 991 remains the timeless 911 sports car it has always been with its classic compact proportions.  Yet it exhibits reinterpreted design language emblematic of its generation’s own place and time.

Despite the bold look and increased size, the 991 shed close to 100 pounds.  How did Porsche do it?  Why, by creating a brand-new, lightweight body with an ingenious exotic aluminum-steel construction.   This new construction not only sheds curb weight, but also provides much greater body-shell rigidity.

Aerodynamic optimization for the 991 yields tidy road-and-track benefits, especially resulting from the 991’s wider, variably rising real spoiler such as:

  • Reduced lift
  • A slippery drag coefficient

The seeming contradictions in terms, like every Porsche before it — performance and efficiency, sportiness and everyday practicality — peacefully coexistence in harmony.  No cognitive dissonance here.  Then, again, it’s a Porsche — which is why there is no substitute.

Specifically, some of the new features and factors include among others:

  • 29Cd drag coefficient
  • Lighter aluminum/steel composite body construction
  • 25% greater torsional rigidity
  • Unique tri-slatted engine cover
  • Slitted LED rear taillights
  • Newly shaped frontal air intakes
  • Repositioned side-view mirrors now newly positioned on the doors

Systems and Features New to the 991-gen Porsche 911

Innovations abound, new to the 991.  They will be discussed in greater detail in the content of the 991-gen Buyer Guide below.  But they can be summarized as follows:

  • Automatic Start/Stop technology
  • Engine and transmission thermal management
  • Electrical system recuperation
  • The world’s first 7-speed manual gearbox
  • PDK automatic transmission “sail” function (i.e., ability to coast while driving)
  • Longer wheelbase by 3.94 inches
  • New rear axle set-up
  • New cockpit design displaying the family resemblance to the Carrera GT’s interior and center console
  • Cutting-edge performance technology
  • Electric power steering (!)

Yes, you’re reading that right.  No typo.  Porsche introduced electric power steering for the first time on the 911.  The impetus for developing and utilizing electric power steering in a 911 as a first was another means to lighten the load.

That is, Porsche’s engineers were able to shed even more weight this way by dumping the hefty hydraulic system needed for the original power steering format.

But perhaps the most significant Porsche milestone cast by the 991-gen Porsche 911 is this:  Starting with the second sub-generation 991.2 gen Porsche 911, it looked as though the naturally aspirated flat-six had come to the end of the line for the most part.

In other words, starting with the 991.2, almost all flat-sixes would be forced-inducted by twin turbos.

This may be dwarfed, however, by the last milestone of Porsche’s decision to ditch the 911’s archetypal air-cooled flat-six, to be replaced by the heretical water-cooled engine of the 996-gen 911.

So not unlike the Porsche 993 being the last 911 to have an air-cooled engine, the last of the 991.1 naturally aspirated 911s could someday begin to see an appreciation in values.  It’s doubtful, though, that any turbochargers will ever replicate that glorious guttural growl of a normally aspirated flat-six.

Porsche built the 991-generaton Porsche 911 from 2011 through 2019.  The first models released were the 911 Carrera, 911 Carrera Cabriolet, 911 Carrera S and the 911 Carrera Cabriolet S.  The very last model was the Porsche 911 Speedster.  All in all, Porsche produced 233,540 units of the 991-gen Porsche 911 in each and every one of its many splendored variants.

Return to TOC / Outline

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Essentials

The 991.2 Porsche 911 — The “End” of the Naturally Aspirated Flat-Six

As Bette Davis once uttered, fasten your seat belts, it’s going to be a bumpy night:  We are about to venture into uncharted territory for both Porsche and all of us Porschephiles, especially all of the very finicky über-purists.

This is the brave new world of the all-turbocharged 911s, with no normally aspirated engines in sight — except for just maybe a few more, of course, which we’ll get in to later in this Buyer Guide.

So all of the territory that will be covered in our forthcoming 991.1-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide will memorialize (in more ways than one) the last of the normally aspirated 911s (notwithstanding the designated eponymous 911 Turbos, of course).

This is the “Dawning of the Regular-Production Twin-Turbocharged 911 Era.”  Going forward, a preponderance of the assorted variants of the Carrera and Carrera S models that hit showrooms fresh off the boat were all powered by twin-turbocharged flat-six boxer engines.

Porsche’s fundamental goal in this regard was to increase efficiency ideally without sacrificing performance.

In fact, performance was increased too.  As Porsche asserted on the eve of the 991.2’s introduction back in 2017, these forced-induction engines produced the greatest performance increase in 911 history, while simultaneously improving fuel economy.

Most of the improvements of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 are discussed below.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Model-Year Features

Porsche 911 Carrera, 911 Carrera Cabriolet, 911 Carrera S and 911 Carrera Cabriolet S — The First of the All-Turbocharged 911 Carreras — 991.2-gen — 2017 through 2019

Overview

Porsche introduces many of its groundbreaking vehicles and concepts to the global automotive industry at the Frankfurt International Auto Show every year.  Porsche does this to let the international industry and ultimately the customers round the world know that they should stand up and take notice.

It stands to reason, then, that Porsche launched the 991.2 Porsche 911 Carrera and 911 Carrera S at the 2015 Frankfurt International Auto Show.

In fact, to some, the 991.2-gen’s introduction could have even been earthshaking, if not downright heretical, akin to the introduction of the 996-gen’s water-cooled engines.  So you may be asking why.  Good question.

For reasons initially alluded to above, the 991.2 phase of the 991 generation of Porsche 911 sports cars set the historic precedent of lowering the curtain on naturally aspirated 911 engines.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2017 through 2019 Model Years (MY) and estimated price ranges of the 991.2 Carrera 2 variants: Carrera 2 Coupe and Cabriolet; and Carrera S Coupe and Cabriolet. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

Released as model-year 2017 vehicles, these Carreras represented the very first batch of 991.2-gen Porsche 911 sports cars powered across the basic 911 model line by twin-turbocharged Porsche 911 engines.

Here are the variants that were initially released at the time:

  • Carrera
  • 911 Carrera Cabriolet
  • 911 Carrera S
  • 911 Carrera Cabriolet S

Yes, the 991.2-gen engine (I’ll get to that bad boy in a moment) was all brand-new to the latest 911 generation.  But Porsche made other significant new sub-generation changes and hatched new sub-generation innovations as well.

For now, though, here is a brief outline of just some of those 991.2 developments, which will be covered later in greater detail:

  • Assistance systems
  • Chassis set-up
  • Exterior 991.2-specific visual cues
  • Interior 991.2-specific updates
  • Mode switch on the steering wheel
  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) re-engineered for the 991.2 gen
  • Porsche Communication Management (PCM) new to the 991.2 gen
  • Rear-axle steering
  • Sport Response Button
  • Wheels

So let’s delve into as many 991.2-gen Carrera specifics as we can:

Brakes

The base, non-S Carrera arrived in showrooms with four-piston calipers on 13.0-inch rotors in front.  Out back, four-piston calipers put the squeeze on 13.0-inch rotors.  The Carrera S came with similar brakes to those of the non-S base model, with the exception of six-piston calipers and 13.8-inch rotors out front on the S.

A new multi-collision brake system came standard on the 991.2 Carrera and 991.2 Carrera S.  The multi-collision brake system activates in rear impact-collision scenarios.  The system consists of the following attributes:

  • Minimizes a second collision into another car or object at the front after the first collision lurches the car forward
  • When triggered by the airbag control unit, this autonomous braking causes deceleration, reducing impact energy
  • The driver can neutralize the system by accelerating or applying harder braking

The brakes themselves were upgraded in unison with the Porsche’s upgrades in performance.  They were new, bigger brakes than those of the previous 991.1 Carreras.  Here are their specs:

991.2 Carrera brakes:

  • Front — larger four-piston aluminum monobloc black calipers — larger 13.0-inch x 1.34-inch (330-mm x 34-mm) steel rotors — increased pad surface by 17 percent
  • Rear — larger four-piston aluminum monobloc black calipers — larger 13.0-inch x 1.10-inch (330-mm x 28-mm) steel rotors

991.2 Carrera S brakes:

  • Front — larger four-piston aluminum monobloc red calipers — larger 13.8-inch x 1.34-inch (350-mm x 34-mm) steel rotors — increased pad surface by 16 percent, adapted from the 911 Turbo
  • Rear — larger four-piston aluminum monobloc red calipers — larger 13.0-inch x 1.10-inch (330-mm x 28-mm) steel rotors

Optional new third-generation Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB) with larger yellow calipers, paired with 20-inch wheels:

  • Front — 16.1-inch x 1.42-inch (409-mm x 37-mm) composite rotors
  • Rear — 15.4-inch x 1.26-inch (391-mm x 32-mm) composite rotors

The higher-performance, longer-lasting PCCB rotor ceramic composition was third-generation material derived directly from the ceramic composition of the 911 Turbo, 911 GT3, 911 GT3 RS and 918 Spyder composite brakes.

You may want to consider taking a pass on these ceramic babies if you run across them unless you plan to do a lot of tracking — or want to lay claim to bragging rights that come standard with those big beautiful yellow calipers.  The standard steel brakes are much more than adequate — as well as much less costly to maintain and repair.  Your call.

Cabriolet Variants

As with their 991.1 predecessors, the 991.2 Carrera Cabriolet and 991.2 Carrera S Cabriolet both arrived at the dealerships with a lightweight magnesium frame that undergirds the retractable roof.  When closed, the cloth top’s ingenious construction sustains that same sleek flyline profile of the Coupé’s hardtop.

Besides its great looks, the Cabriolet roof’s aerodynamics are optimized as well.  In addition, putting the top both up and down takes about 13 seconds.  This can be done while the car runs at speeds of up to 31 mph.

This is a far cry from those “primitive times” (only a decade or so ago, really) when you had to be at a complete stop with your parking brake engaged to put your Porsche cabriolet top up or down.

Chassis and Suspension

The 991.2-gen 911 Carrera and Carrera S came with an upgraded Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) chassis as standard equipment.   Re-engineered specifically for the 991.2 Carreras, this new PASM also lowers the 911’s ride height by 0.39 inch (10 millimeters) in contrast to the 991.1 911 Carrera without PASM.

To increase ride comfort as well as agile handling, PASM also employs adaptive dampers.  Body roll is thus reduced around the twisties, where PASM also increases and improves the 911’s responsiveness on tricky, uneven road surfaces too.

Further reducing roll and pitch and improving rebound response are the rebound springs mounted at all four corners.  Modified coil springs and anti-roll bars round out the fine-tuned tweaking of the new chassis.

Then there’s that novel active rear-axle steering which previously was available only on Turbo and GT models.  A first-time option on the 991.2 Carrera S, rear-axle steering offers these benefits according to Porsche:

  • Greater handling in city traffic
  • Improved handling resulting from the reduced turning radius from 36.7 feet to 35.1 feet
  • Increased stability and agility
  • Smoother upper-speed lane changes

Electromechanical actuators operate the active rear-wheel steering.  These actuators are on the right and left sides of the rear axle, replacing conventional toe control arms.

The steering angle of the active rear-wheel steering varies all the way up to 2 degrees.  This enables high lateral-force potential at the rear axle.

The 991.2 Carreras came with new shock absorbers specific to these second sub-generation 991 models.  Porsche stated at the time that these absorbers with their wider spread characteristics “enhance comfort thanks to an even more precise response characteristic and also improve the body connection during dynamic driving.”

Another option on the Carrera S models was PASM Sport Suspension.  PASM Sport Suspension further lowers ride height by an additional 0.39 inch (10 millimeters).  Porsche stated at the time that the Sport Suspension increases driver and passenger comfort via its new calibration.

Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) was yet another Carrera S option.  Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control minimizes body roll in and out of the corners and decreases lateral instability on uneven surfaces or during sudden lane changes.  Interestingly, PDCC originated on the Porsche Cayenne SUV.

Finally, an optional front-axle lift system was available at the time.  By pushing a single button, this hydraulic lift system — incorporated within the front axle struts’ lifting cylinders — lengthens ground clearance.

This raises the front spoiler lip’s ground clearance by 1.5 inches (40 millimeters), facilitating parking structure entry or steep driveway access.

A Sport Package was also an option, but only on the S models, which included:

  • GT Sport steering wheel
  • Rear-Axle Steering
  • Sport Chrono Package
  • Sport Exhaust System
  • SportDesign exterior mirrors

On Carreras equipped with the optional Sport Chrono Package, the Porsche Stability Management (PSM) system offered an additional mode called “PSM Sport.”  The PSM button located on the center console activates the PSM system.

In stark contrast to the usual “PSM On” mode, PSM Sport mode paves the way for tracking thrills and spills.  PSM Sport mode unleashes balls-to-the-wall raceway performance by enabling more wheelspin and yaw movements.

This allows more daring drivers to push the Carrera models to their performance limits like a proper Porsche ought to behave on the track.

Return to C4 & C4S “Chassis” sub-section

Return to GT3 “Chassis” sub-section

Return to GT3 RS “Chassis” sub-section

Cooling

In this post-air-cooled age of high-performance demands, engine and peripheral-engine cooling has become more critical than ever.  The 996 when introduced posed unprecedented demands for new cooling innovation unheard of previously at Porsche.

Granted, nowadays the demands are perhaps not as drastic as the 996’s cooling requirements back in the day.  Nonetheless, the cooling demands of the new all-twin-turbocharged 991.2 engines and those beyond necessitate innovative methods of meeting those looming cooling technology demands.

Needless to say, this in turn necessitates more and more complex twenty-first-century cooling systems.  The 991-gen cooling systems certainly represent such a case in point.  I’ll try to keep the description and function of these very complex cooling systems as simple as possible.

Unlike cooling systems in the past whose sole purpose was simply to prevent engines from overheating, the 991’s systems are tasked with the hidden agenda of contributing to not only minutely lowering carbon emissions, but also wringing out minuscule increases in gas mileage.  To these ends, the target is to get the engine up to proper operating temperature as quickly as possible.

To hit this moving target in order to deliver on that “hidden agenda” year after year, the 991’s cooling systems employ an elaborate sequence of vacuum-controlled electropneumatic valves that circulate the engine’s coolant around the engine, transmission and heater core.

Consequently, this increases the need for more and more moving parts that are subject to wear and tear over the years — thus increasing the odds and possibilities for more malfunctions and repairs.

There are additional components to the 991-gen cooling systems, of course.  Here are some of the anterior (at the front of the car) cooling features new to the 991.2 Carreras:

  • Cooling air intakes above the newly designed squinting front headlights in the attractive new front fascia are just the beginning
  • Airblades and active cooling air flaps or vanes inherited from the 918 Spyder in that newfangled front fascia
    • Optimize cooling objectives to deal with critical heat management
    • Enhance aerodynamics
  • Airblade settings
    • Idling — actuator opens three flaps
    • Above 9 mph — closed if no additional cooling is needed

Here are the car’s posterior (at the rear of the car) cooling features, which are critical to the newly adopted 991.2 twin-turbo radical technological change in course:

  • Cooling ports ahead of the rear spoiler
  • Adaptive rear spoiler angle to adjust to air-cooling demands, thus contributing to the engine’s thermodynamic management, as well as to aerodynamics
  • Intercoolers now engineered back of the rear wheels are fed by openings behind the engine grille, with discharge out through the air outlets at the bottom of the rear fascia
  • Sharpened aerodynamics because air intakes are now no longer required for placement in the rear quarter panels

Engine

Sorry for the suspense — now, what we’ve all been waiting for:  Some tasty facts and stats about those new bad-boy 991.2 twin-turbocharged 9A2 engines.

The all-new twin-turbo flat-six 911 Carrera engine of the base Carrera arrived with a displacement of three liters, generating 370 hp and torque of 331 lb.-ft.  Impressively, the engine of the the 911 Carrera S pumps out 420 hp and torque of 368 lb.-ft. — with the very same 3.0-liter displacement.  This translates to a respective 20 hp increase over their 991.1 predecessors.

Maximum torque ratchets up from 1,700 rpm to 5,000 rpm, redlining at 7,500 rpm.  Maximum horsepower peaks out at 6,500 rpm.  Coming standard was a seven-speed manual transmission meshed with these first-generation force-inducted boxer sixes.

You may be wondering as did I at first about that huge elephant in the room:  What was the method to Porsche’s seemingly utter madness in tacking to the new, uncharted course of turbocharging almost all post-991.1-gen 911 engines?

Well, it’s nuts and bolts, really.  A turbocharged engine benefits from the advantage of higher direct output, generating virtually identical power output of a naturally aspirated engine.  Moreover, this 991.2 engine outperforms the top speeds of most conventional turbocharged engines.

The rub is, the turbocharged engine accomplishes this with a savings of appreciably less displacement — not to mention an incremental increase in fuel economy — yet producing an almost maximum 12 percent increase in efficiency relative to naturally aspirated engines.

YouTube video of the engine in the 2017 991.2 Porsche 911 Carrera

The downside, however, is the audio generated — or lack thereof — by these more powerful engines.  That unique soundtrack of a naturally aspirated 911 is now virtually non-existent in the 991.2 turbocharged engines.

Pity.  But Porsche tried to compensate for this deficiency by piping amplified engine sounds into the cabin.  (Please see “sound duct button” below in the “Interior” section.)

Some of the 991.2-gen engines’ enhancements Included the following:

  • Cylinder heads now have optimized intake and exhaust ports, advancing air flow and cross-flow cooling
  • Cylinder walls have a new plasma beam coating with iron, reducing friction as well as fuel and oil consumption
  • Fuel injectors are centrally repositioned from their previous positioning on the sides, improving combustion for increased fuel economy and decreased emissions
  • A secondary air injection system is no longer necessary to heat the catalytic converters
  • VarioCam Plus — new to the 991.2 is the system’s provision of continuous adjustment of the exhaust camshaft timing

So, bottom line, the new 991.2 engine derives its performance superiority in accordance with:

  • Twin turbochargers benefiting from modified compressors
  • Tuned engine management tailored specifically to 991.2 processing
  • Exhaust system also specific to the 991.2

Exterior

Some of the more apparent exterior visual cues when introduced were as follows:

  • The aforementioned new front and rear fascias with added cooling and aerodynamic functionality, both with more angular edginess
  • Bi-Xenon™ headlights and Porsche-identifying four-point daytime running lights from the 919
  • Door handles now shedding the previously existent grip shells of its predecessors
  • Newly designed rear lid grille formed by black longitudinal vanes, taillights modeled in three dimensions and (for the U.S. market) two longitudinal third stoplights in the center
  • Refreshed rear lighting package bearing 918 Spyder DNA with a three-dimensional appearance
  • Exhaust output varies by trim level in terms of standard or optional equipment:
    • 911 Carrera — one central muffler outputting to two oval tailpipes
    • 911 Carrera S — two integrated exhaust flaps with dual tailpipes
    • Optional Sport Exhaust System — also includes operating flaps that open at about 3,300 rpm with the visual cue of two centrally mounted chrome-plated tailpipes emitting a sporty sonorous sound on acceleration
  • New colors were introduced with the release of the 991.2 models:
    • Carmine Red as a special color
    • Miami Blue as a special color
    • Graphite Blue Metallic as a new metallic color
    • Night Blue Metallic as a new metallic color

Interior

The Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system was new to the 991.2 models.  Some of the upgraded features include:

  • Glass-covered touchscreen
  • Online navigation
  • Pairing with your smartphone
  • Real-time traffic info

PCM responds to multi-touch gestures, not unlike those of a smartphone.  The system also recognizes handwritten user input.

The upgraded online navigation system integrates Google® Street View, Google® Earth and real-time traffic information and monitoring.  This upgrade improves traffic assessment and allows better destination re-routing, according to Porsche.

Connect Plus is now accessible, as well, thanks to the Connect Plus module.  Hence vehicle functions can be remotely controlled, destinations can be transferred for navigation through the PCM system and music streaming is available through third-party service providers.

Pairing with a smartphone is easier too.  This allows access to many more apps on the touchscreen.

Two steering-wheel types were available at the time of release.  Evolved from the steering wheel first seen in the 918 Spyder, the new wheel was called the GT Sport.  Here are the two wheels that were on offer and their dimensions:

  • Standard wheel: 14.8 inches (375 mm)
  • GT Sport wheel: 14.2 inches (360 mm)

A sound duct button is accessible on the console’s right-side column of buttons.  Once pressed, the amplified sounds of the turbos stream in to the cabin.  Of course, this is one way to try to compensate for the mediocre sounds the twin-turbo engines generate compared to the previously awesome sounds of the naturally aspirated predecessor engines.  (Please see “audio generated” above in the “Engine” section.)

Also available to the 911.2 Carreras when debuted was a new Lane Change Assist function.  Radar sensors employed by the Lane Change Assist system monitor the sides and rear of the car, as well as the car’s blind spots.  Lane Change Assist alerts the driver to any vehicles that occupy these zones.  The system can be turned off or on via the instrument cluster’s onboard computer.

Porsche introduced new interior leather colors with the release of the 991.2 models:

  • Bordeaux Red
  • Graphite Blue
  • Saddle Brown

Performance

Both the 991.2-gen 911 Carrera 9A2 engine and the 991.2-gen 911 Carrera S 9A2 engine have an identical displacement of 3.0 liters.  Yet the Carrera S engine yields 420 horsepower, 50 more ponies than the base Carrera engine.

This is because the Carrera S engine has turbochargers with larger impellers.  The S turbos produce boost pressure of 16 psi (1.1 bar), whereas the base non-S turbos generate 13.1 psi (0.9 bar).

In either case, the induction engineers at Porsche have worked hard to virtually eliminate any turbo lag.  Boost pressure is kept to a constant optimum — or “pre-loaded” as the engineers liked to point out upon the 991.2’s introduction — instantaneously available under any and all driving conditions and throttle applications, said Porsche.

In addition, the S engine has an upgraded model-specific exhaust system, and tuning of the S engine management system has been tweaked for more power.

Top track speed for the Carrera is 183 mph, and 191 mph for the Carrera S.

Equipped with the optional Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) and Sport Chrono Package, the base 991.2 911 Carrera Coupé zooms to 60 mph in a mere 4.0 seconds.  This is 0.2 second faster than the 991.1 Coupé.

The 991.2 911 Carrera S Coupé goes one better identically equipped, accelerating to 60 in 3.7 seconds.  When fully loaded with all performance-enhancing regalia, the Carrera S can conquer the Nürburgring-Nordschleiffe in 7:30 minutes — a surprising 10 seconds quicker than its 991.1 predecessor with similar performance enhancers.

Another improvement over its predecessor is the fact that the 991.2’s new PSM Sport mode offers a substantially higher intervention threshold for greater thrills.

Despite the superior performance, the new Porsche turbocharging technology yields less fuel consumption — by design.  Improved fuel economy was one of the major objectives in transitioning to turbocharging in the first place, as alluded to at the top of this Buyer Guide.

For example, the 991.2-gen 911 Carrera Coupé with PDK earns EPA numbers of highway 30 miles per gallon (MPG) and combined 25 MPG — 2 MPG better than the previous 911 Carrera Coupé.

Another feature inherited from the hybrid map switch of the 918 Spyder is the mode switch on the steering wheel, a first for the 911 Carrera.  There are four settings on the switch’s rotary dial:  “Normal,” “Sport,” “Sport Plus” and “Individual.”

A fifth button known as the “Sport Response” button comes with PDK cars only.  This “bonus” button, if you will, gooses the powerplant for maximum acceleration for 20 seconds.  This is somewhat analogous to IndyCar’s “push to pass” capability.

Transmission

As cited previously, the 991.2-gen Carrera and Carrera S 911 vehicles offered a standard seven-speed manual transmission and an optional Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) automatic transmission.

991.2 Standard Seven-Speed Manual Transmission
  • Customized to the 991.2-gen’s dual-turbocharged engine, accounting for its new powerband
  • Gears 3 through 7’s longer ratios may give you pause: This gearing is intended to reduce fuel consumption while still sustaining the vehicle’s responsiveness, whatever that means
  • The higher torque of the new engines necessitated the engineering of this new gearing
  • A new two-disc clutch was engineered to increase comfort by mitigating the turbocharged engines’ higher torque, especially when powering around twisty roads
  • Centrifugal pendulum — serves as an adaptive vibration absorber, allowing for upshifting at low revs and slower driving speeds
991.2 Optional Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) Automatic Transmission
  • New to the 991.2 PDK was the change in the gear lever’s shifting direction — upshifts occur when pulling back, and downshifts happen when pushing the lever forward — pull back to upshift, and push forward to downshift
  • In manual mode, PDK no longer automatically upshifts when the rev-limiter is approached
  • Centrifugal pendulum paired with a dual-mass flywheel — serves as an adaptive vibration absorber, allowing for upshifting at low revs and slower driving speeds

For more elaboration from Porsche Car North America’s perspective, study the launch of the 2017 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Carrera by tapping or clicking here.

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Return to “C4 and C4S” Section

Porsche 911 Carrera 4, 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet, 911 Carrera 4S and 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet — The First All-Wheel-Drive Trim Lines of Gen 991.2 — 2017 through 2019

Overview

Here are the very first of the 4-wheel-drive 991.2-gen 911 Carreras:

  • 911 Carrera 4
  • 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet
  • 911 Carrera 4S
  • 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet

These 991.2 C4 and C4S variants were virtually identical to the 991.2 C2 and C2S ones — with the obvious exception of their new all-wheel-drive systems.  So please refer to the C2 and C2S section immediately preceding this one for details on shared features and essentials between the C4 and C2 variants.

Tap or click here to access common C4 and C2 features

Porsche Traction Management (PTM) delivered power to all four wheels with Porsche’s electrohydraulic control when introduced.  This ingenious mechanism was genetically adapted from the Porsche 911 Turbo’s electrohydraulic control.

As with the C2 and C2S variants, the Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S models have a sleeker exterior and a new Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system that boasts a first-time glass-covered touchscreen and online navigation.

Likewise, the Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S models possess the same 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six engines — the C4 generating 370 hp and torque of 331 lb.-ft., and the C4S impressively pumping out 420 hp and torque of 368 lb.-ft. with the very same 3.0-liter displacement.

Source: StuttgartDNA

The C4 and C4S variants go their own separate ways, however, by virtue of their superior speed over the C2 and C2S 911 models.  That is, the C4 and C4S variants’ electrohydraulic controls enable faster acceleration than the rear-wheel-only-drive 911 Carrera models.

(Also see “Performance” below to learn more about how Porsche Traction Management (PTM) and the electrohydraulic control optimally work together, facilitating the aforementioned faster acceleration.)

Because the C4 and C4S unleash power at all four corners, the 991.2-gen 911 Carrera 4 models have greater grip and traction — thus, faster acceleration.  Yet, despite this power improvement, fuel efficiency has also increased.

A major visual cue that distinguishes the C4 and C4S from their rear-wheel-drive stablemates is that beautiful rear backside.  It is 1.7 inches (44 millimeters) wider.  The new light strip running between the rear lights further accentuates the broader C4 and C4S.  In the past, wider haunches have also been the distinguishing feature on previous C4 and C4S variants.

Yet there are many identical elements between the C2 and C2S models and the C4 and C4S models, as mentioned.

  • Brakes
  • Cabriolet Variants
  • Chassis and Suspension
  • Cooling
  • Engine
  • Exterior
  • Interior
  • Performance
  • Transmission

As revealed under the Carrera 2S discussions in the previous section, the following options were also available for the 911 Carrera 4S:

  • Active rear-axle steering
  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM)
  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) Sport Suspension
  • Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC)
  • PSM Sport Mode
  • Sport Chrono Package
  • Sport Package

Tap or click here to access common C4 and C2 features

Chassis and Suspension

For more detailed information on the chassis and suspension of the Porsche Carrera 4 and Porsche Carrera 4S, please tap or click on this link or the link immediately below to learn more about the shared chassis and suspension features and essentials that the Porsche Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S share with the C2 and C2S models.

Tap or click here to access more Chassis info

Exhaust

A Sport Exhaust System came as optional to original buyers who desired it at the time of release.

The Sport Exhaust System produces its own specific guttural sound.  Of course, this modified sound can be turned off with the touch of a button in the cabin for more comfortable long-distance touring and the like.

The exhaust can be identified by its round, dual, centrally mounted tailpipes out back.

Performance

The Porsche Traction Management (PTM) of the C4 and C4S derives from the PTM of the 911 Turbo.

As alluded to previously, Porsche Traction Management (PTM) and the electrohydraulic control optimally work together.  This coordination facilitates the Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S’s aforementioned faster acceleration.  This is possible because the two work together for optimal power distribution to the car’s two axles.

In other words, an electrohydraulically controlled multi-plate clutch acts to engage the front axle on demand.  Consequently, PTM acts more precisely and efficiently than in earlier models in directing power to the front axle.  This in turn results in improved handling and greater traction, enabling the following:

  • Greater torque applied to the front wheels than in past models
  • Increased acceleration resulting from optimized coordination among the engine, the all-wheel-drive system and the transmission

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Return to “Targa 4 and Targa 4S” Section

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Pictured 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Pictured here are two Porsche Targas in black and in red. Source: Credit: Porsche AG

Porsche 911 Targa 4, 911 Targa 4S and Targa 4 GTS— 991.2-gen — 2017 through 2019

Overview

Introduced in 2017, the 991.2 Targa trim lines arrived in showrooms in the following variants:

  • 911 Targa 4
  • 911 Targa 4S
  • 911 Targa 4 GTS

The 991.2-gen 911 Targa 4 and 911 Targa 4S shared all of the characteristics discussed above in the section entitled “Porsche 911 Carrera 4, 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet, 911 Carrera 4S and 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet.”  Please refer to that section for further details.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2017 through 2019 Model Years (MY) and estimated price ranges of the 991.2 Targa 4 variants: Targa 4, Targa 4S and Targa 4 GTS. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

Yes, the latest Targa models possessed that inherent Targa bar that replaces the B pillars.  But it parts ways with the original Targa concept in that it now has a retractable roof section above the cockpit and a wrap-around rear window that has no C pillar.

The whole roof section opens and closes robotically by activating a button.  Upon the top opening, the roof section tidily stows itself.  Obviously unique to the Targa trim lines is its variation on the original classic Targa theme.  Now, the whole retractable roof on the 991.2 Targa variants is like a Transformer robot in its own right.

I hope you have deep pockets if you desire one of these Targa variants.  My fear is that — with all of its many moving parts — this robot-like roof will be very expensive to repair should it ever malfunction out of warranty.

There are Targa 4 and Targa 4S features that are shared in common with the four-wheel-drive Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S covered in the previous section.  Some of them are listed immediately below.

  • Brakes
  • Cabriolet Variants
  • Chassis and Suspension
  • Cooling
  • Engine
  • Exterior
  • Interior
  • Performance
  • Suspension
  • Transmission

Tap or click to access common Targa 4 and C4 features

Return to TOC / Outline

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Seen here is the GTS Interior passenger side. Credit: Porsche AG

Porsche 911 GTS, 911 GTS Cabriolet, 911 4 GTS and 911 4 GTS Cabriolet — The First of the 991.2 GTS Trim Levels — 2017 through 2019

Overview

Check out the array of the 991.2 GTS models Porsche placed on offer upon initial release at the time:

  • 911 GTS
  • 911 GTS Cabriolet
  • 911 4 GTS
  • 911 4 GTS Cabriolet

Great.  But what does “GTS” stand for, anyway?  Glad you asked, if you perhaps didn’t know.  “Grand Turismo Sport.”

Porsche upped the ante in the power arms race with the release of the first 991.2-gen GTS models.  All variants listed above represent the most powerful non-GT 991.2 911 sports cars.

But how can this be?

Well, Porsche developed GTS-specific turbochargers for the universal 991.2 3.0-liter, twin-turbo, flat-six engine.  These turbochargers that are unique to the GTS variants sported a larger housing, turbine and compressor — larger by 4 mm.

Consequently, the GTS variants pump out force-inducted air at higher boost pressures than those of their Carrera and Carrera S stablemates — 18 psi (1.25 bar) compared to 16 psi (1.1 bar) produced by S variants.  This higher forced induction generates about 450 hp at 6,500 rpm and torque of 405 lb.-ft. between 2,150 and 5,000 rpm.

The result:  An increase of 30 hp over Carrera S variants, and a 20-hp increase over the previous naturally aspirated 991.1-gen GTS models.

Source: StuttgartDNA

So how did the 991.2 GTS models come to be?

The GTS’s raison d’être was to slot in between the Carrera S and the 911 GT3 in terms of performance.  The GTS variants did this by deploying engines with more power than the S variants.  The standard equipment of the Sport Chrono package and PASM active damper system also contributed to this increase in power and performance.

So is there some advantage to opting for a GTS over a Carrera S?  Or why not just take the plunge and splurge on a GT3?  While some detractors scoff at the notion of the GTS’s mere existence as simply a deceptive options gimmick, it indeed does have its advantages.  Here are just a few:

  • Relieves you of some of the hassle of having to juggle and choose among Porsche’s myriad options
  • Saves you the dough you would have to spend for a GT3 which may be overkill in terms of your desired usage
  • Most important, the GTS packages a nice, tidy bundle of a select few options that Goldilocks may also determine to be “just right” if she too were an avid Porsche enthusiast

Among others, here are the GTS’s major distinguishing features:

  • Active damping
  • Lowered ride height
  • More horsepower than the Carrera and Carrera S
  • Signature black wheels and blacked-out headlights
  • Sport Exhaust System

Here are features that came standard with all GTS models:

  • 20-inch center-lock wheels
  • Alcantara interior
  • Bi-Xenon® headlights
  • Dynamic Engine Mounts
  • GTS badging
  • Leather-trimmed sport seats
  • Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS)
  • Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV)
  • Sport Chrono Package
  • Sport Design Front Spoiler
  • Sport Design side mirrors

There were two transmissions introduced upon initial release:

  • Seven-speed manual trannie as standard and
  • Seven-speed Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) automatic dual-clutch trannie as optional

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991.2-gen Porsche 911 Turbo pictured in immediate foreground. Credit: Porsche AG

Porsche 911 Turbo, 911 Turbo Cabriolet, 911 Turbo S and 911 Turbo S Cabriolet — 991.2-gen — 2017 through 2019

Overview

Next are the first of the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo models:

  • 911 Turbo
  • 911 Turbo Cabriolet
  • 911 Turbo S
  • 911 Turbo S Cabriolet

As the top-of-the-range Porsche 911 Carrera variants, the Turbo models are the fastest- and highest-performance non-GT 911s.  In fact, they even out-perform a 991.2 GT model or two, but don’t tell Porsche you heard it from me here in this publication.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2017 through 2019 Model Years (MY) and estimated price ranges of the 991.2 Turbo variants. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

The 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S models’ greatest attribute is probably their engines’ ability to squeeze out awesome power without sacrificing handling and efficiency.  True, this is the case with most if not all of the 991.2 variants over their 991.1 counterparts.  But — with apologies for that much-over-used cliché — the Turbos do it on steroids.

They’re not called “Turbo” — with a capital “T” ­— for nothing.

For starters, the Turbos’ newly designed twin turbochargers have much larger impellers than those in the past.  In addition, the turbochargers have variable turbine geometry, meaning that the impeller angles adjust instantaneously in obedience to the constantly changing conditions from moment to moment for maximum forced-induction efficiency.

Then there is that Dynamic Boost.  This feature maintains turbo boost pressure over the range of load changes, thus enhancing throttle response.  (More about Dynamic Boost under “Engine” below.)

The result of all of the above and more?  The revised tried-and-true 9A1 3.8-liter engines of the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S pump out 540 hp and 580 hp, respectively.  These specs represent 20 more hp than their 991.1-gen 911 Turbo counterparts.

The aforementioned Dynamic Boost feature as well as the Sport Chrono Package both came as standard on the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo models.  The Sport Chrono Package came with four programs, with a Sport Response button as standard, too.  The Sport Response button and the Sport Chrono mode switch were moved to the steering wheel for the first time in the Turbo models.

There was a 2-MPG improvement over the 991.1 Turbos, too.  But I seriously doubt that you need to save on gas during the daily commute and grind, when you can afford even the non-S Turbo — which had the “lowest” MSRP of $161,800(!), not including the customary $1,050 destination charge, of course.

Here are some other features of the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S:

  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) — (standard) — as discussed under previous variants above
  • Automatic Post-Collision Braking System — (standard) — as discussed under both previous variants above as well as below
  • Front-Axle Lift System (optional)
  • Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) — standard on the 911 Turbo S, but optional on the 911 Turbo
  • Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system — standard on the 911 Turbo S, but optional on the 911 Turbo

The  Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system — the latest generation at the time — was new to these 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S and all other 991.2 models.  Some of the main features included the following at the time of release:

  • Online navigation
  • Latest glass touchscreen technology
  • Real-time traffic info
  • Pairing with your smartphone

Standard equipment and features offered on the 911 Turbo were as follows:

  • LED headlights with Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS)
  • Park Assist, front and rear, including a camera for backing-up view
  • Sport Chrono Package

Just some of the standard equipment and features offered on the 911 Turbo S included:

  • 18-way Adaptive Sport Seats Plus with leather backrests
  • Carbon Fiber interior trim
  • LED headlights with Porsche Dynamic Light System Plus (PDLS+)
  • Sport Design exterior mirrors
  • Turbos that are beefier than those of the non-S Turbos (a little known secret, at the time) — details follow below
  • Two-tone leather interior

A new Lane Change Assist function was available on the 911 Turbos.  Radar sensors used by the Lane Change Assist system monitor the sides and rear of the car, including blind spots.

Lane Change Assist warns the driver about any vehicles occupying these zones.  The system can be turned off or on by way of the onboard computer in the instrument cluster.

Further 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and Turbo S features and issues follow in greater detail.

Aerodynamics and Chassis

Aerodynamics

The 991.2-gen Turbo models when introduced were all about an abundance of aerodynamics.  By that I mean they came with active, adaptive aerodynamics, which seamlessly, instantaneously adjust to a wide array of driving conditions whether on road or track.

This is in contrast to passive aerodynamic tuning — a mediocre, trial-and-error compromise between efficiency and performance.

How did Porsche tweak its aerodynamics to such a degree?  Answer:  Porsche Active Aerodynamics (PAA).

By pressing just one button, Porsche Active Aerodynamics consists of a diabolical yet lovely syncopated pas de deux between the 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S models’ multi-adjustable front spoiler and rear slotted wing, which is adjustable along two planes, attack angle and height.

Porsche Active Aerodynamics generates really sick amounts of downforce that were previously unheard of in Porsche non-GT automobiles.  Some key elements of Porsche Active Aerodynamics in the Turbo variants are these:

  • Coordinates the balance of aerodynamic lift between the front and rear axles
  • Operates in three essential downforce modes
    • Initial mode — this is an inert, neutral mode
    • Speed mode — activated above 75 mph
    • Performance mode — generates 291 lbs. of downforce from 186 mph, increasing lateral grip by 10 percent
  • The front spoiler is capable of extending its three segments in different positions, thus generating various degrees of downforce
  • The slotted rear wing can adjust its height and attack angle, also generating various degrees of downforce in concert with the front spoiler

In addition, there was an Aerokit option available at the time of the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo models’ release featuring:

  • An optional front spoiler bearing side fins
  • At 186 mph and above, the Aerokit provides an additional downforce of 40 lbs.(!)
  • An optional redesigned rear deck lid with a fixed rear spoiler sporting side winglets, in addition to the standard automatically adjusting rear wing
Chassis

The Porsche 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S when introduced were, and still are, among the most drivable and comfortable sports cars on the market.  Some standard elements include all-wheel drive, rear-axle steering, etc.

Among other features, here are just a few of the systems that contribute to that great handling and drivability:

  • Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC)
    • Porsche’s active anti-roll system
    • Optional on the 911 Turbo and standard on the 911 Turbo S
    • Keeps body-roll angles to a minimum under aggressive driving scenarios
    • Increases driving comfort during straight-line driving — results from substantially decoupling the anti-roll bars
    • PDCC comes on stronger and firmer under Sport Plus mode, contributing to faster lap times
  • Porsche Stability Management (PSM)
    • The PSM button is on the center console
    • Brief push of the button activates PSM Sport mode, allowing more wheel slip and much larger yaw movements
    • Raises car’s performance limits on the racetrack
    • The instrument cluster displays a warning light and message indicating whenever PSM system is activated
    • Driver has full control over deactivating the PSM system at any time
  • Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus)
    • Porsche’s system that varies the volume of torque transmitted to the rear tires in direct synchronization with the car’s mechanical rear differential lock
    • Under aggressive cornering, the outside rear wheel receives mild brake pressure, generating yaw movement (i.e., additional rotational pulse) around the vertical axis of the car, resulting in greater steering turn-in response
    • The mechanically controlled rear differential lock kicks in under aggressive driving speeds and upon accelerating out of turns
  • Porsche Traction Management (PTM)
    • Porsche’s electrohydraulically controlled all-wheel-drive system
    • Transfers the Turbos’ monster torque to the front wheels with increased precision and consistency
    • Allows for dynamic and fully variable distribution of torque between the front axle and rear axle for reduced wheelspin and improved vehicle control
    • Assists with managing the vehicle’s lateral limits when pushed hard
    • Ensures more precise traction, handling and high-performance drivability
  • Rear-Axle Steering
    • Electromechanical actuators on both sides of the rear axle power this steering
    • Adjusts the steering angle of the rear tires up to 2.8 degrees
    • Turns the front wheels and rear wheels in opposite directions below 31 mph — causing the Turbo to feel like a vehicle handling with a much shorter wheelbase
    • Turns the front wheels and rear wheels in the same direction above 50 mph — causing the Turbo to feel like a vehicle handling with a much longer wheelbase
    • Gives the 911 Turbos one of the smallest turning radiuses in the industry — i.e., 34.8 feet (10.61 meters)
    • Overall results are (1) rapid and less disruptive impact on the chassis and (2) greater high-speed lane-change stability on both road and track

An optional front-axle lift system was available for the first time on 991.2-gen Turbo models.  By pressing just one button, this electrohydraulic system integrated within the front axle struts’ lifting cylinders extends ground clearance.

To facilitate parking structure entry or steep driveway access or to clear steep speed bumps, this front-axle lift system raises the front spoiler lip’s ground clearance by 1.5 inches (40 millimeters).

Here are the front-axle lift system’s attributes and operating conditions:

  • Goes all the way up or down in about 5 seconds
  • Its activation button is located in the center console
  • Its operation is displayed in the instrument cluster
  • Requires the engine to be on to function

Return to GT3 “Chassis” sub-section

Brakes

As usual, the brakes on the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S are phenomenal.  The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system came optionally on the 911 Turbo and as standard on the 911 Turbo S.

Even though the PCCB braking system produces ridiculous stopping power, the 911 Turbo’s standard cast-iron brake rotors are still outstanding in their own right.  These standard brakes feature the following:

  • Red calipers — enclosed monobloc construction, making them stronger yet more lightweight
    • Front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
    • Rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
  • Brake rotors
    • 15 inches, both front and rear
    • Cast-iron composite
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance in the wet
    • Rotor hubs composed of aluminum
    • Friction rings composed of gray cast iron
    • Unsprung mass at a minimal 8.8 lbs. (4.0 kg.)

The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system came as standard on the 911 Turbo S.  These PCCB brakes feature the following:

  • Yellow calipers — enclosed monobloc construction, making them very strong yet even more lightweight
    • Front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
    • Rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
  • Brake rotors
    • 1 inches (41 cm) in front
    • 4 inches (39 cm) in the rear
    • Ceramic construction, with a higher concentration of ceramic composition than in earlier generations
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under wet conditions
    • Bolted on, as opposed to spring mounted as on earlier models
    • About 50 percent lighter than standard rotors of similar size
    • Unsprung and rotating mass are super-lightweight for greater performance, agility and handling
    • Rotor hubs composed of forged and anthracite-anodized aluminum

A new automatic post-collision brake system came as standard on the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo models.  The automatic post-collision brake system is activated in rear-impact collision scenarios.  The system consists of the following attributes:

  • Minimizes a second collision into another car or object at the front after the first collision lurches the car forward
  • Triggered by the airbag control unit, this autonomous braking causes deceleration, reducing impact energy
  • The driver can neutralize the system by accelerating or braking harder

Engine

Resurrected yet upgraded 9A1 flat-sixes, the 991.2 Turbo engines consist of the following:

  • 3.8 liters
  • Direct fuel injection
  • Electronic demand-based oil pump
  • Expansion intake system
  • Integrated dry-sump lubrication
  • Twin-turbocharging
  • Variable turbine geometry

But these items are among the only ones shared between the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S.  That is, this is the first time in recent memory that the 540-hp 911 Turbo and 580-hp 911 Turbo S engines differ in mechanical terms:  They are fitted with different turbochargers.

The turbochargers in the 911 Turbo S engine are larger and more robust:

  • Larger impeller wheels
  • Modified housing supply for processing the forced air more efficiently

Porsche introduced the new Dynamic Boost function to reduce throttle response time to the barest minimum.  Dynamic Boost maintains boost pressure hence reducing that throttle response.

Dynamic Boost does this by holding the throttle valve open.  This is in contrast with conventional engine control unit (ECU) management, which shuts down the throttle valve whenever the driver lifts off the accelerator — thus suffocating boost pressure.

The result of the Dynamic Boost function:  The twin turbos keep pumping out that boost pressure — improving throttle response and increasing velocity whenever the driver puts the pedal to the metal again and again.

There’s a Dynamic Boost gauge on the instrument cluster alerting the driver of the boost function’s usage.  While Dynamic Boost is always running behind the scenes, it does have its own dynamic operation.  For example, boost pressure crescendos to its peak in the various Sport modes.

Exterior

The 991.2-gen 911 Turbo variants came with new exterior characteristics.  These models arrived with basic features of the 911 Carrera models.  But they also possessed their own distinctive 911 Turbo styling cues.

Some of these exterior facets included new colors, distinctive wheels, and Turbo visual cues setting them apart from their 911 Carrera stablemates.

For example, Carmine Red and Miami Blue were available as special colors for the Turbos.

The front fascia was new to the Turbos, incorporating side airblades, LED headlights and position lights, and turn-signal indicators, giving the front of the car a wider appearance.  The middle air intake has an additional louver.

The LED headlights came standard with the Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS), which consists of the following:

  • A headlight cleaning system
  • Dynamic cornering lights
  • Dynamic leveling control
  • Four-point daytime running lights
  • Speed-dependent headlight range control

As a standard feature, the 911 Turbo S sported PDLS Plus, which includes dynamic, camera-based headlights with high-beam assist.

The 911 Turbo models arrived with standard newly designed 20-inch wheels.  The center-lock wheels on the 911 Turbo came with ten dual spokes.  The center-lock wheels on the 911 Turbo S sported seven dual spokes.

The rear fascia also enjoyed a refresh, which also optically widened its hips.  Some of the distinctive Turbo visual cues included the following:

  • More air outlet ports to enhance charge-air cooling
  • Redesigned rear decklid cover — while there are central air-intake vanes for optimized air induction, on either side of these vanes are black longitudinal vanes
  • New rear fascia accentuates the width of the rear end
  • Three-dimensional taillights with glowing illumination and four-point brake lights
  • Newly designed dual tailpipes
    • Chrome-plated stainless-steel tailpipes for the 911 Turbo
    • Black-chrome-plated stainless-steel tailpipes for the 911 Turbo S

Interior

The 991.2-gen 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S arrived in showrooms with a plush interior.

Out front and center was the newly designed Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system.  PCM boasts new online navigation as well as a state-of-the-art touchscreen.  The screen is almost as simple as a smartphone to operate.

The upgraded online navigation system incorporates such activities as Google® Earth, Google® Street View and real-time traffic information and monitoring.  Connect Plus can be accessed, too, through the Connect Plus module.  Pairing with a smartphone is a snap.  By so pairing up, you can access many more apps on the touchscreen.

New interior leather colors were introduced with the release of the Turbo models:

  • Bordeaux Red (optional)
  • Saddle Brown (optional)
  • Two-tone Black/Bordeaux Red interior (standard on the Turbo S models for the first time)

Performance

As we all know, any Porsche Turbo model is synonymous with performance, and these 991.2-gen Turbos exude superior performance.

The newly redesigned Sport Chrono Package came standard on the 911 Turbo variants.

Porsche moved the input for the Sport Chrono Package from the center console, where the buttons were originally, to the new GT sport steering wheel, which measures 14.1 inches (360 mm) in diameter.

The repositioned Sport Chrono Package mode switch has four mode settings on the switch’s rotary dial:  “Normal,” “Sport,” “Sport Plus” and “Individual.”  As discussed previously in the Buyer Guide, this is another feature inherited from the hybrid map switch of the 918 Spyder.

“Individual” mode paves the way for some provocative driver customizations.  Here are the available individual settings that can be combined — and any of these customized combinations can be stored as favorites — in the “Individual” menu in the instrument cluster:

  • Auto Start-Stop function
  • Front Spoiler and Rear Wing positions
  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) activation
  • Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) activation

There is a fifth button, known as the “Sport Response” button.  As discussed above in the sections covering the 991.2 Carrera models, this “bonus” button, gooses the drivetrain for maximum acceleration for 20 seconds.  IndyCar fans will recognize this feature as somewhat analogous to “push to pass” capability.

How the Sport Response button functions is quite complicated and beyond the scope of this Buyer Guide.  But suffice it to say that it is really cool.  In any event, here are some of the components that come into play when the Sport Response function is activated for maximum performance responsiveness between the engine and the PDK transmission:

  • Delayed upshifts to higher gears
  • Dynamic Boost optimization
  • Ignition timing lag
  • Special PDK gear-shift mapping
  • Throttle valve opened wider
  • Variable turbine geometry closing down the turbochargers’ blades, which also increase in rotation

The tried-and-true Launch Control setting came standard, allowing for optimal acceleration.

Also coming as standard were dynamic engine mounts, which increase bearing spring rates.  These dynamic engine mounts function by employing sensors that detect aggressive driving behavior and then respond by firming up the liquid-filled engine mounts.

Transmission

The Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) was the only available transmission for the 991.2-gen 911 Turbos.  This PDK was specially tuned for the Turbos based on Porsche Motorsport’s experience on racetracks around the world.

In fact, one of the earliest iterations of the PDK transmission propelled the No. 17 Rothmans Porsche factory team Porsche 962 C race car across the finish line to win first place overall at the 1987 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Opposite to the operation of previous PDK transmissions, the Turbos’ manual PDK mode allows for pushing the gear selector forward to downshift, and pulling the selector back to upshift.  This is now identical to the shifting in Porsche GT cars and race cars.

Also, when in manual mode, the transmission prevents automatic upshifting, which gives the driver complete control over how to use the transmission.

As is the case in the Carrera variants, the PDK’s dual-mass flywheel sports an integrated centrifugal pendulum.  Porsche boasted at the time of release that this feature improves engine smoothness at low rpm’s, thus reducing engine vibration.

Return to “GT3” Section

Return to TOC / Outline

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Depicted here is a Racing Yellow Porsche 911 Carrera T, right-front. Credit: Porsche AG

Porsche 911 Carrera T — 991.2-gen — 2018 through 2019

Overview

Is the Porsche 911 Carrera T a Worthy Successor to the Porsche 911 R?

Truth be told, the 991 Carrera T was intended to fill the gargantuan gap left by the wildly successful but outrageously expensive 911 R — not to mention to satiate über-purists starved for a much “purer” driving experience that spawned the apotheosis of the Porsche Mystique in the first place.

To this end, 911 chief engineer August Achleitner, who crafted the 911 R, subsequently developed the 911 T.  But the question is, does the 911 T live up to the celebrity of the 911 R?

Served up in a paltry 991 units (get it?), the extremely limited-edition 911 R was a throwback, reminiscent of the early basic, driver-centric, by-the-seat-of-your-pants 911 sports cars of yore.

Porsche and Mr. Achleitner fashioned the 991.2-gen 911 T as a purer sports car without detriment — or benefit — of any technological training-wheel nanny devices to make you look better on either road or track or to save your ass during any recklessly ill-advised maneuvers.  In short, a true driver’s sports car.

Origins of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 T

The “to-a-T” Porsche 911 T is based on the model-year 1968 through 1973 Porsche 911 T (“T” for “Touring”).  That 911 T back then was considered the 911’s entry-level model.  It, in turn, was based on the four-cylinder Porsche 912.

The engine of the early T started out at 110 hp, then later increased to 130 hp.  The way to tell it apart from the more powerful 911 variants of its day was by way of its visual cue of a silver logo, as opposed to the gold logo of other 911 models.

Introducing the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 T

Likewise, this 991.2-gen 911 Carrera T is also a throwback to same said simpler times — and simpler, spirited, lightweight Porsche 911 sports cars.  Unfortunately, though, it isn’t the budget-minded version of the 911 R as Porsche had hoped it would be.  Not as expensive and limited as the 911 R, the 911 T is no bargain-basement R, either.

But the 991.2-gen 911 Carrera T is still very exciting to drive and carve the canyons with in by-the-seat-of-your-pants classic Porsche style.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2018 through 2019 Model Years (MY) and estimated price range of the 991.2 Carrera T. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

Back in August 2018, Excellence magazine said the following about the Carrera T:  “Considering its array of enthusiast-focused features and options, the Carrera T could be thought of as a GTS version of the standard 911 Carrera. (The 911 Carrera GTS is based on the Carrera S.)”

Some detractors at the time derided and dismissed the 911 Carrera T as just a parts-bin car.  Little did they know what a compliment that was.  And, oh, what a wonderful parts-bin car it indeed is — what with its choicest equipment selected from the best of the best 911 options.

In broad strokes, the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Carrera T weighed in at a svelte 3,142 pounds and featured the following when released:

  • 370 hp base drivetrain of the Carrera
  • Bucket seats (optional)
  • Front spoiler lip
  • Lightweight Carrera S wheels (20-inch)
  • Lightweight door loops
  • Lightweight-glass rear and side windows
  • Mechanical differential lock
  • PASM Sport Suspension
  • PCM communication system delete (could be added at no charge)
  • PDK transmission (optional)
  • Rear seats delete (could be added at no charge)
  • Rear-wheel steering (optional)
  • Reduced sound insulation
  • Shorter rear-axle ratio than the base Carrera drivetrain
  • Shorter-throw shift lever
  • Sport Chrono package
  • Sports exhaust
  • Sport-Tex seats

Further 991.2-gen 911 T features and issues follow in greater detail.

Brakes

As with predecessor model variants, brakes of the 911 T came in two flavors — the standard cast-iron brakes and the optional Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system.  Both systems are more fully described in the various model sections above.  Interestingly, PCCB was not available on the entry-level Carrera 911.

While the PCCB system offers incredible stopping power, the standard cast-iron brakes are more than adequate.

The 911 T is best suited to carving curves or negotiating autocross cones, as opposed to aggressively crashing onto and off the rumble strips and sausage kerbs on track days.  So the PCCB system could be overkill.  But ultimately that’s your call to make if during your hunt you run across a T with PCCB.

Chassis and Suspension

The 911 Carrera T came with some features that were unavailable to the 911 Carrera.

One such example is the PASM Sport Suspension, which affords a lowered 0.79-inch (20-mm) ride height.  Aerodynamics are enhanced by the front spoiler lip.

Rear-axle steering was also an option that wasn’t available on the non-S 911 Carrera.

Engine and Performance

The very scarce 2018 and 2019 991.2-gen 911 Carrera T arrived at dealerships with a twin-turbo 3.0 flat-six powerplant derived from the 991.2-gen 911 Carrera.  The engine puts out 370 hp and 331 lb.-ft. of torque.  Said torque pulls across the broad engine-speed range from 1,700 to 5,000 rpm.

Because of the Carrera T’s better power-to-weight ratio, the T arrives at 60 mph in 4.3 seconds.  This comes courtesy of the standard manual trannie’s shorter constant transaxle ratio and the car’s standard mechanical rear differential lock.

Exterior

Exterior features included the following when the Carrera T left the factory at the time:

  • 20-inch Carrera S wheels in Agate Grey
  • Porsche logotype, rear decklid louvers, and “911 Carrera T” logo in Agate Grey
  • Sport Design exterior mirrors in Agate Grey
  • Sport Exhaust System with black exhaust tips

Paint options available at the time of delivery were the following:

  • Black
  • Carrera White Metallic
  • GT Silver Metallic
  • Guards Red
  • Jet Black Metallic
  • Lava Orange
  • Miami Blue
  • Racing Yellow

Interior

Interior features of the 911 Carrera T included the following when arriving at local dealers:

  • Carrera T Interior Package
  • Door opener black loops in lieu of the usual door handles
  • Full Bucket Seats (optional with a rear-seat delete)
  • GT Sport Steering wheel with leather trim and Driving Mode rotary switch
  • Headrests with black “911” embossed logo
  • Reduced sound insulation
  • Seat centers covered in Sport-Tex fabric
  • Shortened gear lever embossed with a shift pattern in red

Transmission

The 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Carrera T came standard with a manual six-speed transmission, and a shorter constant transaxle ratio.  The quicker PDK transmission could be ordered as an option.

The manual trannie gets up and goes from 0 to 60 in 4.3 seconds, 0.1 second ahead of the standard 991.2 Carrera.  The manual’s top track speed is 182 mph.

The optional Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission shifts the Carrera T down the track to 60 mph in 4.0 seconds with an assist from the standard Launch Control function.  Its top track speed is 180 mph.

Return to TOC / Outline

Pictured here are the 1999 Porsche 991.1 911 GT3 model in background and 2018 991.2 911 GT3 model in foreground. Credit: Porsche AG
The 2018 991.2 911 GT3 model in foreground and the 1999 Porsche 911 GT3 model in background. Credit: Porsche AG

Porsche 911 GT3 — The First of the 991.2 GT3 Models — 2018 through 2019

Overview

Probably the most astonishing thing on the surface about the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 when introduced in late 2017 was this novelty:  The 911 GT3 was the first 991-gen GT car to offer an optional-at-no-cost manual transmission(!) “for the purists,” Porsche said at the time.

The second most astonishing thing was this 911 GT3’s normally aspirated(!) engine.  And what a pedigree:  The new engine of the 911 GT3 contained the very same DNA strands of Porsche’s racecars, such as the 911 GT3 R and the 911 RSR.

In fact, the 911 GT3 was conceived and incubated in Weissach.  All cars were built from the ground up on the same production line that constructed the 911 GT3 Cup racecars.

Among other standard features, the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 came with the following:

  • An explosive 500-hp, 4.0-liter flat-six, with 339 lb.-ft. of torque
  • Distinctive 20-inch wheels
  • Dynamic engine mounts
  • GT3-specific aerodynamic characteristics
  • Lightweight carbon-fiber rear wing
  • Massive front brakes
  • Mechanical rear differential lock
  • Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) double-clutch automatic transmission
  • Sound Package Plus 8-speaker stereo system
  • Sport Seats Plus
991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2018 through 2019 Model Years (MY) and estimated price range of the 991.2 GT3. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

Porsche designed the 2018–2019 911 GT3 to be the ideal intensive nexus between daily driving during the week and track-day performance on weekends.  This goal was accomplished by conglomerating the following:

  • The newly designed 4.0-liter flat-six engine
  • The redesigned chassis consisting of lightweight construction and rear-axle steering
  • The GT3-specific PDK automatic transmission or the GT3-specific six-speed sports manual transmission

For example, check out the 911 GT3’s power-to-weight ratio of 6.4 pounds per hp for the PDK-equipped GT3.  Impressive.

The chassis was specially tuned for high performance and awesome handling.  The two major components employed in this regard were the following:

  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM)
  • Rear-axle steering

The 991.2-gen 911 GT3 sports car’s bespoke aerodynamic design also contributed to its superior handling and grip, combining these aerodynamic elements, thus increasing downforce:

  • Front and rear fascia
  • Rear underbody diffuser
  • Carbon-fiber rear wing

The interior of the 911 GT3 is comparable with what one would expect of such a sports car.  The 911 GT3 came with a GT Sports Steering wheel and choice of three seat packages.  The Porsche Track Precision app came as standard.  The Porsche Communication Management (PCM) system offered Internet connectivity with an array of Internet services.

I go into greater depth regarding these aforementioned and other features of the 991.2-gen’s 911 GT3 below.

(Please also see the more in-depth discussions above under the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo about Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), Rear-Axle Steering, Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission, mechanical rear differential lock, etc.)

Tap or click to access the 911 Turbo section

Tap or click here to access more PDK info

Brakes

The 991.2-gen’s 911 GT3’s standard composite brake rotors as first introduced in 2017 were phenomenal.  They featured the following:

  • Calipers — enclosed aluminum monobloc construction, with front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers, and rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
  • Brake rotors
    • 15 inches (380 mm), both front and rear
    • Cast-iron composite
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under wet conditions
    • Friction rings composed of gray cast iron
    • Rotor hubs made of aluminum
    • Unsprung mass at a minimal 8.8 lbs.

The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system was even more phenomenal at introduction — but you will pay the price of the cost to service and maintain them over the life of the car.  These PCCB brakes feature the following:

  • Yellow calipers — enclosed monobloc construction, making them both strong and even more lightweight
    • Front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
    • Rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
  • Brake rotors
    • 1 inches (410 mm) out front
    • 4 inches (390 mm) in the rear
    • Approximately 50 percent lighter than standard rotors of similar size
    • Bolted on, as opposed to spring mounted
    • Ceramic construction, with a higher concentration of ceramic composition than earlier generations
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under wet conditions

Chassis and Suspension

The 991.2-gen 911 GT3 arrived on the scene with a specifically 991 GT3-tuned Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) chassis, inspired by the company’s long experience in motorsport competition.

(Also please see the discussion of PASM and rear-axle steering under the 911 C2 section above for a deeper elaboration on these and other chassis and suspension features.)

Tap or click here to access the above-referenced 911 C2 section

The 991.2-gen 911 GT3’s PASM employs an active adaptive spring/damper system for optimal ride comfort as well as agile handling.  The 911 GT3 delivers greater road and track performance in synchronization with the active rear-wheel steering, the PASM adjustable damper system and the dynamic engine mounts.

In the 991.2 GT3, the PASM variable shock-absorber system offers the choice of two mappings:

  • Normal mode — enables normal stability when traversing uneven road, highway or track surfaces
  • Sport mode — paves the way for more aggressive driving on a variety of road, highway or track surfaces, minimizing body roll and movements for more precise, agile handling

Moreover, further track optimization can be tweaked to the driver’s desires by adjusting toe, camber and caster, in addition to fine-tuning sway-bar settings and adjusting the car’s ride height.

The active rear-axle steering system utilizes electromechanical actuators to activate rear-wheel steering.  The steering angle varies all the way up to 1.5 degrees.  This enables greater stability by increasing high lateral-force potential at the rear axle.  Rear-axle steering also tightens the sports car’s turning radius.

The GT3 was introduced with an optional front-axle lift system.  Press one button — and presto! — this electrohydraulic system raises the car’s front end by about 1.18 inches (30 mm).  This extends ground clearance to avoid damage to the front fascia and fascia’s spoiler lip on uneven road surfaces.  The lift system is operable on the move up to approximately 37 mph.

Engine

So how about that 991.2-gen 911 GT3’s high-revving 500-hp, 4.0-liter flat-six, huh?  Naturally aspirated, too!  Pumping out 339 lb.-ft. of torque!  This was an increase of 15 lb.-ft. as well as 25 hp more than the 3.8-liter engine of the 991.1-gen 911 GT3.

It’s no wonder, then, that this flat-six was a genetic reincarnation of the very same purebred powerplants of the 911 GT3 R, 911 GT3 Cup and 911 RSR racecars.

This GT3 engine generates higher revs than usual, too.  The engine clock indicates a crankshaft whirling up to a redline high of 9,000 rpm — notably the 991 GT3 R engine’s identical redline.  It follows then that the higher the revs, the higher the output of power.

How is this achieved?  Glad you asked.  Well, without going too deep “inside baseball,” it goes something like this:

The wily wizards of Weissach crafted the diabolical “rigid valve drive.”  Even at the highest of speeds, this rigid valve drive dispenses very precise gas exchange.  This is possible because the rocker arms are positioned on axles — not held on the usual suspects of hydraulic balancing elements.

In addition, the correct valve clearance never ever needs readjustment because it has already been permanently set at the factory by employing replaceable shims.

The overall result is that the rigid valve drive and an adapted spring design work in concert to optimize the staying power of the valve drive while reducing any losses to friction.

Got it?  Then maybe you can explain it better back to me…  😉

Bluntly put, though, as any caveman will tell you, GT3 go fast — really, really fast!

But if you have a simpler, more-easily-understandable explanation of the rigid valve drive’s function and efficacy, then please  share it with all of us in the Comments Section below, immediately following this StuttgartDNA 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide.

Some less less complex reasons, however, as to why the GT3 goes very fast relate to its track-bred racing roots:

  • 3:1 high compression ratio
  • Dry-sump lubrication with an auxiliary oil tank and seven scavenge pumps returning oil rapidly to the external oil tank
  • New cylinder heads
  • New iron-coated cylinder liners
  • New oil pump with central oil distribution providing optimal lubrication to the bearings of the connecting rod
  • New piston rings
  • Rennsport-inspired centrifuge to de-foam the oil before transfer to the auxiliary oil tank
  • Rennsport crankshaft derived from the 2016 911 R and 911 GT3 RS providing:
    • Larger main bearings
    • Beefier rigidity
  • Titanium connecting rods, etc. etc. (new and improved — see “Engine Recall” below)

Tap or click here to go to the “Engine Recall”

Return to GT3 RS “Engine” sub-section

Exterior

Aerodynamics and Bodywork

By definition, all Porsche GT sports cars are about maximized aerodynamics (as are other Porsche automobiles, if only perhaps to a lesser extent).  And the 911 GT3 is certainly a good case in point.

In fact, the aerodynamics and bodywork of the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 are inextricably intertwined.  The weight of the 911 GT3 is at the center of this symbiosis too.  How so?

In the first place, the bodywork is lighter than your typical 911 because of the lightweight materials used to construct the body components.  These lighter yet durable materials are polyurethane with hollow glass spheres and carbon fiber.

Built-in aerodynamic and other exterior bodywork elements at the front consist of the following:

  • Front fascia
    • Larger air intakes on both sides with lateral air blades increase cooling air intake
  • Larger radiators for improved cooling
  • GT3-specific air duct aft of the “frunk” (luggage compartment) lid
    • Increases front-axle’s downforce
    • Increases air-flow intake
  • Front spoiler lip adds to the front-axle’s downforce

Built-in aerodynamic and other exterior bodywork elements at the rear of and underneath the 911 GT3 consist of the following:

  • Rear engine lid
    • Made of carbon fiber beneath the exterior car color
    • Central ventilation inlet situated higher than the previous GT3 — increases heat diffusion
    • Ram-air scoops (2) in black improve the engine’s air supply as a result of dynamic air pressure engineered into the design
    • Composed of glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP)
  • Fixed rear wing with side blades in black — crux of the GT3’s aero package
    • Made of carbon fiber beneath the exterior car color
    • Heart of the sports car’s greatest downforce, as can be imagined
    • About 0.79 inch (20 mm) higher than the wing of the GT3’s 991.1 predecessor
    • Central ventilation is also higher, increasing heat dissipation
  • Newly designed underbody paneling
    • Adds more downforce resulting from an enlarged surface area and four additional fins accelerating air flow
    • Serves as a diffusor, providing more downforce

In the final analysis, the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 boasts about 340 pounds (150 kg) of downforce at top speed.  This substantial downforce is approximately 20 pounds (9 kg) greater than that of the GT3’s 991.1 predecessor.

At the time of introduction to the marketplace, the 911 GT3’s body itself inherited the 911 Carrera 4’s shell.  This body is about 1.7 inches (44 mm) wider at the wheel arches in the rear than the 911 Carrera.  By another comparison, the ride height of the GT3 is lower.

Another differentiating visual cue is the is the Sports Exhaust System’s central black twin tailpipes.

Tires and Wheels

The 991.2-gen 911 GT3 sports cars rolled into showrooms on the latest generation of UHP (Ultra High Performance) tires.  Baby’s shoes enable high-performance cornering at very high speeds:

  • Front — 245/35 ZR 20
  • Rear — 305/30 ZR 20

The Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) came standard.  The Tire Pressure Monitoring System issues warnings under both gradual or sudden pressure-loss scenarios.  TPMS also possesses an ingenious Race Circuit mode, which accounts for lower-pressure cold tires when starting a track session.

The standard set of wheels were silver forged center-lock alloy wheels:

  • Front — 9 x 20 inches
  • Rear — 12 x 20 inches

Porsche’s theory on the advantage of center-locking wheels is that their reduced rotating mass increases performance.

The following wheel options and finishes for the 911 GT3 were also available:

  • Satin Aluminum
  • Satin Black
  • Satin Platinum

Interior

GT Sport Steering Wheel

As mentioned previously, the GT Sport steering wheel evolved from the 918 Spyder’s innovative steering wheel.  Here are some of its highlights:

  • Adjustable manually in both height and length up to about 1.5 inches (40 mm) both vertically and axially
  • Black Alcantara® covering the wheel itself
  • Black wheel spokes
  • Measures 14.1 inches (360 mm) in diameter
  • Shift paddles with short throws and precise haptic pressure points
Porsche Communication Management (PCM) System

At the time of the 991.2-gen 911 GT3’s introduction, the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) System on offer was the new, latest-generation PCM.  The PCM included Online Navigation, Porsche Connect Plus, Porsche Car Connect and mobile phone preparation.

(Please also see the PCM discussion under the GT3 RS below for greater elaboration on all available features of PCM.)

Porsche Track Precision App

The Porsche Track Precision app came standard on the GT3.  This track-day app allows the driver to track driving data on his/her smartphone.  Specifically, the driver can display, record and analyze lapping data.

The PCM comes into play vis-à-vis the Porsche Track Precision app by transmitting a precise 10-Hz GPS signal to a smartphone to compare lap times on the smartphone.  If the optional Chrono Package is available, the lap-comparison function can also be manually triggered through the Chrono Package.

To get really anal about it, Porsche Tequipment offered an aftermarket lap trigger device that can be set up at the start/finish line to even more accurately capture lap times and then in turn transmit that data to both the PCM and to the smartphone app.

Chrono Package with Performance Display

The Chrono Package with performance display was an available option when the 911 GT3 rolled onto the lots of dealerships lucky enough to have received precious allocation.

The optional Chrono Package also provides monitoring through the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) System.  Some of these capabilities include the display of:

  • Comparative analysis of the current lap with last lap as well as previous laps
  • Fastest lap time
  • Lap data
  • Remaining fuel on board
Connect Plus Module

This Connect Plus module feature was standard within PCM at the time of the 911 GT3’s introduction.  The Connect Plus module, as its name implies, paves the way for all Internet, Wi-Fi and telephonic connectivity in the sports car.

Here are the Connect Plus module’s major features:

  • Contains an LTE telephone module with a SIM car reader
    1. Optimizes voice quality over your smartphone
    2. Provides wireless Internet access
  • Enables tablets, smartphones, laptops and any other connectible device to access the Internet within the car — simultaneously, if desired
  • Grants access to almost all available Porsche Connect services and amenities
Stereo System

The 991.2-gen 911 GT3 offered two stereo systems at the time; one standard and the other optional:

  • Sound Package Plus System — standard
    • 150 watts
    • 8 speakers
  • Bose Surround Sound System — optional
    • 550 watts
    • 12 speakers and amplifier channels
    • 100-watt high-performance subwoofer
    • Fully adjustable to optimally tailor any speaker to the acoustics of the car’s interior

Tap or click here to access more PCM info

Return to GT2 RS “PCM” sub-section

Return to GT3 RS “PCM” sub-section

Seats

The 911 GT3 came with three choices of front seats upon its initial release:  Sports Seats Plus, Adaptive Sports Seats Plus and Full Bucket Seats.  Here are their respective features:

  • Sports Seats Plus — standard
    • Black leather covers with black Alcantara centers
    • Electronic adjustment of backrests and seat height
    • Headrests adorned with platinum grey “GT3” logo stitching
    • High bolsters providing comfortable lateral support
    • Mechanical forward and backward adjustment
  • Adaptive Sports Seats Plus — optional
    • 18-position electronic adjustment
  • Full Bucket Seats — optional
    • Electronic height adjustment of about 2 inches (50 mm)
    • Fabric adorned with GT3 stripes, and headrests embossed with the Porsche Crest
    • Integrated thorax airbag
    • Mechanical forward and backward adjustment on both seats
    • Plastic reinforced with light carbon fiber, with a carbon-weave finish

Rear seats were excluded from the 911 GT3, a common delete on all GT variants thus reducing weight.

Return to GT3 RS “Seats” sub-section

Performance

By definition, the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 is all about p-e-r-f-o-r-m-a-n-c-e.  After all, it was developed on the experience and trials by fire of every race that Porsche Motorsport has contested round the world.

So here are some noteworthy performance stats of the 2018 and 2019 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3:

  • 339 lb.-ft. of torque
  • 500 horsepower
  • Lightning-fast-shifting standard 7-speed PDK automatic transmission, or optional-at-no-extra-cost six-speed sports transmission
  • Naturally aspirated 4.0-liter, flat-six engine teeming with DNA genetic strands stretching from the 911 GT3 Cup and 911 RSR racecars
  • Power-to-weight ratio of 6.4 pounds per hp
  • Redlining at a screaming 9,000 rpm
  • Top track speed of 198 mph (manual gearbox)
  • Zero to 60 mph in 3.2 seconds (PDK)
  • Zero to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds (manual gearbox)

Transmission

So at long last, the save-the-manual proponents and Porsche purists could choose a manual transmission in the 911 GT3 when released, a first.  The seven-speed Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) double-clutch seven-speed transmission was also on offer for faster automated lap times.

Six-speed Manual Transmission

By the way, the new GT sport six-speed manual transmission came at no extra cost.  It weighs about 33 lbs. less than variants with PDK.  The mannie trannie confers these tasty treats:

  • Lightweight dual-mass flywheel inherited from the genuinely awesome 911 R
  • Mechanically controlled rear differential lock with higher locking values (i.e., 30/37 percent) than even those of the 911 R (deployed in conjunction with Porsche Torque Vectoring [PTV] for greater agility and traction)
  • Optimal gear ratios tuned in total sync with the 991.2-gen 911 GT3’s new racing engine
  • Rev-match function activated or deactivated by pressing the center console’s “Sport” button
  • Short shift lever for short throws
Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) Double-Clutch Automatic Seven-Speed Transmission

Porsche has zealously campaigned for the Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) automatic transmission for many years now.  There was and is a reason that more and more Porsche vehicles come with the dual-clutch PDK only.  And that reason is the PDK’s record-breaking lap times on world-class racetracks round the globe.

Even decades ago  — with an embryonic dual-clutch transmission — the legendary Porsche 962 C won the 24 Hours of Le Mans overall.

But, for Porsche, today’s superior lap times over cars with manual transmissions serve as fodder for great publicity.  For example, the bragging rights to ballyhoo record lap times around the Nürburgring’s Nordschleife are worth their weight in gold.

So how does the Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) automatic transmission accomplish these awesome lap times?  In essence, PDK virtually guarantees optimal acceleration and shifting efficiency by producing millisecond gear changes with little to no loss of traction.

How can you beat the millisecond timing of a finely tuned robot anyway, hmn?

Here are some of the PDK highlights of the Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) double-clutch automatic seven-speed transmission that was available when the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 was released:

  • All seven gears tuned uniquely to the 911 GT3 for those tasty track days
  • Electronic transmission control to guarantee spontaneous as well as instantaneous downshifts and upshifts
  • Gearshift paddles, which feature:
    • Revised shift direction as in Porsche racecars: pull back to upshift, push forward to downshift
    • Pressure points deliver precise haptic feedback
  • PDK “Sport” mode unleashes much more aggressive downshifts, and enables upshifts at higher rev speeds when accelerating
  • PDK works in precise concert with Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus) and the electronically controlled rear differential lock and Porsche Stability Management (PSM) to optimize grip and traction

The PDK in the 911 GT3 also came with a “Paddle Neutral” feature:

  • Total PDK clutch release when both paddles are pulled back simultaneously
  • Clutch re-engagement is instantaneous once both paddles are released — the aggressiveness of this re-engagement is dependent upon whether PSM is on (less) or off (more)
  • Allows for greater control and handling in the wet or when assertively entering and exiting turns
  • Enables acceleration from a dead stop similar to operating a manual transmission

Return to TOC / Outline

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Pictured here is a Miami Blue 991-2 GT2 RS, seen from its left-front side, parked outside a track garage, Credit: Porsche AGPorsche 911 GT2 RS — 991.2-gen — 2018 through 2019

Overview

Porsche skipped over a plain-wrap 991 GT2 model.  Instead, Porsche bee-lined it straightaway to this 991.2-gen GT2 RS variant I’m about to get all goo-goo-gaga over…er, I mean, soberly deliberate upon with utmost dispassion…

The 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT2 RS debuted during its world premiere at the 2017 Goodwood Festival of Speed in the U.K.  It premiered alongside its genetically adjacent stablemate, the Porsche 911 Turbo Exclusive Series, also being introduced at the time to the international automotive world.

Upon subsequent release of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT2 RS, Porsche touted the super-twin-turbo GT as “the fastest and most powerful street-legal 911 model ever.”  The marketing department at Zuffenhausen wasn’t kidding, either, speaking truth in advertising.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2018 through 2019 Model Years (MY) and estimated price range of the 991.2 GT2 RS. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

Dotingly yet ruthlessly crafted by GT development chief Andreas Preuninger and his likeminded engineering team of need-for-record-breaking-track-speed devotees, the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT2 RS reigned at the very “tippy-tippy top” of the 911 food chain.  At the time, no other Porsche 911 could match nor exceed the GT2 RS’s specs or performance.

Here’s but a mere sampling of the numbers of the world’s fastest eye-popping, head-exploding, face-melting 911:

  • 8-liter, huge-twin-turbo, flat-six engine, based on the thoroughbred powerhouse of the 991.2-gen 911 Turbo S
  • 700(!) horsepower — 80 hp more than the previous 997-gen 2011 GT2 RS
  • 553(!) lb.-ft. of torque — 37 lb.-ft. more than the previous 997-gen 2011 GT2 RS
  • From stop-to-go-to-60 mph in 2.7(!) seconds
  • Quarter mile in 10.3(!) seconds at 140(!) mph
  • 211(!) mph top track speed

Finally, MSRP at the time of release was $293,200 plus $1,050 in destination costs.  Lots of luck if you find a specimen anywhere only slightly north of that figure.  Values have appreciated substantially.  The car was first available in early 2018.

Summary of Key 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT2 RS Features

PDK Transmission

With all good news comes some bad too — the GT2 RS came with a PDK transmission only — no manual gearboxes allowed.

Then again, not unlike the other thoroughbreds in the GT stable, the GT2 RS was intended by Mr. Preuninger and fellow engineering devotees to break and set track records now, wasn’t it?  The lightning speed of PDK virtually sates that hunger over a manual trannie now, doesn’t it?

Furthermore, this suitably matched 7-speed double-clutching automatic provides uninterrupted torque transfer no matter the road or track conditions, propelling this rear-wheel-drive GT to unrivaled heights.

Twin Turbochargers

The twin turbochargers of the GT2 RS aren’t just any parts-bin turbos.  Unique to the GT2 RS, its turbochargers are larger than all the ones that came before them.  Such forceful induction increases the volume of air blasted into the combustion chambers to a substantial degree.

This in part and in turn accounts for those visceral explosive, almost exponential power surges felt as the engine clock’s needle whirls northward then eastward toward redline.

Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) abounds on the 991.2-gen Porsche GT2 RS — which stands to reason as the GT2 RS lost as many pounds as possible not only to maintain its girlish figure, but more importantly to remain as light as possible on its Michelins around any given racetrack.

Soaking wet (i.e., with a full tank of gas), the GT2 RS weighs in at a graceful 3,241 pounds — but that’s without the air conditioning and PCM infotainment systems, which Porsche allowed original buyers to delete at no charge.

If you haven’t gathered by now, the GT2 RS is all about reigning supreme on the racetrack.  Early on, it once set and held the Nürburgring Nordschleife record of 6:47.25, the fastest lap at the time for any production car.

Moreover, this 991.2 turbo GT was 10 seconds quicker than the previous 997-gen GT2 RS and slightly less than 10 seconds faster than the former record-setting Porsche 918 Spyder supercar.

Porsche Design GT2 RS Wristwatch

Incidentally, if you run across a GT2 RS in your quest for a CPO or non-CPO vehicle, be sure to ask the current owner if he or she obtained the special-issue Porsche Design GT2 RS wristwatch at time of purchase.

The Porsche Design GT2 RS wristwatch was available only to owners who bought the GT2 RS new.  The unique and relatively rare watch could be ordered only when purchasing the GT2 RS new from the dealer.

If you do unearth this watch along  with the car, make sure to also get the accompanying Certificate of Authenticity that came with the watch, if still available.

Weissach Package

As with the GT3 RS discussed later in the next model section, a Weissach Package was also available as an option when purchasing a new GT2 RS.  So be on the lookout for that package too in your searches for your very own GT2 RS.  Again, it’s all about wringing out more and more performance and power.

How much bang do you get for the big, big bucks you could shell out for the Weissach Package?  Weight reduction is the underlying goal to yield even faster laps during your track days.

Back in the day when one could purchase the car new from a dealer, the Weissach Package would have cost you the sticker price of $31,000.  The Weissach Package first made its appearance vis-à-vis the Porsche 918 Spyder supercar.

Here are the major Weissach Package features pertaining to the 991.2-gen Porsche GT2 RS:

  • A reduction of weight of close to 40 pounds
  • Weight savings yielded from the substitution of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) as the composition of the front and rear anti-roll bars, their coupling rods and the roof
  • Unlike on the GT3 RS, coming as standard equipment in the GT2 RS Weissach Package are BBS Platinum-colored forged magnesium wheels, which reduce about an additional 25 pounds
  • Other Weissach-specific visual cues include the front lid and roof adorned with a carbon-weave finish, as well as the rear wing imprinted with the visual yet subtle “PORSCHE” logo across the top
  • Interior visual cues include:
    • A defining Weissach Package plaque affixed to the cupholder cover
    • Headrests stitched with the Weissach Package logo
    • Lighter-weight carpeting and
    • Steering-wheel trim and super-lightweight gearshift paddles composed of CFRP

The Bay of Biscay Davy Jones Porsche Museum

Porsche slated a total of 1,000 units of the 911.2-gen GT2 RS for manufacture.

GT2 RS production ended around February 2019.  But then, four brand-spanking-new GT2 RS specimens ended up at the bottom of the Bay of Biscay off the coast of France, on March 12, 2019.  They were beginning their long journey across the Atlantic to their new owners’ driveways on the continent of South America.

It turns out that the four GT2 RS sports cars embarked on their charted voyage aboard the cargo ship Grande America.  A specialized international car-carrier as well, the ship caught fire and ultimately sank in the Bay of Biscay en route to delivering its cargo of automobiles to Brazil.  There were 33 more Porsche vehicles aboard the Grande America as well.

In the aftermath of this nautical debacle, Porsche arrived at the decision to restart GT2 RS production.  Porsche wanted to make good on the four GT2 RS sports cars — now deep asleep in Davy Jones’ locker — by manufacturing their replacements for their rightful buyers.

Brakes

The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system came standard on the 911 GT2 RS.  Derived originally from Porsche’s motorsport experience and technology, the PCCB system was produced for a street-legal car here.  But even though it was standard, PCCBs could be costly in terms of their servicing and maintenance over the lifetime of the car.

The exceptionally fade-resistant PCCB brakes of the 911 GT2 RS at the time of introduction featured the following:

  • Brake rotors
    • 1 inches (410 mm) out front
    • 4 inches (390 mm) out back
    • Bolted on, as opposed to spring mounted
    • Ceramic construction — this iteration for the GT2 RS consists of a higher concentration of ceramic composition than found on earlier models
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under all wet conditions
    • Approximately 50 percent lighter than similarly sized standard rotors — yields a significant reduction in unsprung weight and rotating mass
  • Yellow calipers — enclosed monobloc construction, making them both strong and yet even more lightweight
    • Front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
    • Rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers

Chassis

Here are some of the track-day features unique to the GT2 RS’s race-bred chassis.  These items were available at the time of purchase for supersized performance, grip and handling:

  • PCCB system came standard
  • Porsche Stability Management (PSM) is specifically tuned for the GT2 RS to allow for balls-to-the-wall track performance. PSM deactivation, however, is possible by using two separate function settings:
    • ESC OFF and
    • ESC+TC OFF
  • Rear-axle steering
  • Ultra-High Performance (UHP) tires
    • 265/35 ZR tires in front
    • 325/30 ZR tires out back

Engine

The latest-generation super-turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six engine of the GT2 RS replaced the customary 3.6-liter flat-sixes found in predecessor GT2 RS sports cars.  When introduced, this new GT2 RS engine was an immediate genetic descendent of the pedigree power plant found in the 991.2 911 Turbo S.

The engine produces 700 horsepower and 553 lb-ft of torque at 2,500 rpm.  It also boasts new customized pistons to achieve a lower, sweeter compression ratio.

Turbo Envy

As mentioned, this GT2 RS engine benefits from two larger, throatier turbochargers forcing greater ridiculous blasts of air into the flat-six’s combustion chambers.  In turbocharged vehicles of the past, automakers once endeavored to conceal “turbo lag” and its sudden subsequent surge of boost as much as possible — a fool’s errand until recent times.

Not so in this baby, though.  Proud Papa Preuninger happily conceded during first drives for the press that the beefy twin turbochargers bluntly make their presence felt as the engine clock races past 2,500 rpm, all the way to peaking out at 7,000 rpm, before hitting the rev limiter at 9,000 rpm.

In short, anachronistic blunt-force exponential acceleration is back — now that’s what I’m talking about!

Mr. Preuninger wanted that visceral sensation to set the GT2 RS boldly apart from its other GT siblings in the Porsche stable, as well as from turbocharged competitors in the marketplace.  So enjoy it, rather than shun it as has been practiced over the years.

Engine Basics of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT2 RS

It was reported in the automotive press at the time of release that the 211-mph top speed of the 991.2 GT2 RS was deliberately limited — not unlike a rev limiter functions — in order to keep the tires intact.  The assumption was, the tires would no doubt blow to shredded smithereens at speeds exceeding that “taboo” 211-mph limit.

Truth?  Or clever marketing strategy?  Your call.

The GT guys in Flacht also came up with an ingenious secondary cooling system.  This entails the deployment of water injection that cools the inlet gases.

In a nutshell, without spewing too much mind-numbing detail, here’s how it all works:

  • the system siphons distilled water from the 1.3-gallon tank fitted in the front trunk’s luggage compartment, or “frunk”
  • the water flows aft, ultimately reaching the engine
  • there the water spritzes over the intercoolers above a pre-set intake, air-temperature threshold
  • the desired result is constant optimal power output even under the most extreme operating conditions

Pretty neat, huh?

Launch control is available as has been previously discussed in various models above.

The clutch-dump feature is likewise available.  This “Paddle Neutral” function fully disengages the current clutch when the driver pulls back both paddle shifters simultaneously; then upon releasing the paddles, the clutches instantaneously re-engage.

This allows you to simulate a more manual, analog experience if you crave that at any given time.  In addition, deft use of the neutral paddle function allows you to mute understeer on turn-in; or, conversely, to spool up oversteer when exiting the corners.

With its own unique, model-specific exhaust note, the specially designed GT2 RS exhaust system is composed of lightweight titanium, weighing 15 pounds less than the exhaust system in the 911 Turbo.

Exterior

The 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT2 RS is one of the lightest 911 sports cars ever.  Here’s why:

Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) abounds on the 991.2-gen Porsche GT2 RS:

  • Assorted rear components
  • Front fenders
  • Front luggage compartment lid
  • Miscellaneous interior components
  • Rear quarter panel air intakes
  • Side-mirror outer shells on the Sport Design exteriors
  • Wheel housing vents

Magnesium makes up the standard roof section.

Interior

Again, in the interest of paring down weight — a racecar’s worst enemy — the air-conditioning system as well as the PCM infotainment system could be deleted at the time of ordering a GT2 RS.

But if PCM was kept on the vehicle, it was the latest generation of the original 991-gen refresh.  4G data connection was available through subscription, as was Apple CarPlay mirroring, but no Android connectivity.

Here were the available stereo systems:

  • Sound Package Plus at 150 watts with eight speakers came standard
  • Bose 555-watt, 12-speaker system as an option

(Please also see the PCM discussion under the GT3 RS below for a much greater elaboration on all available PCM features.)

Tap or click here to access more info on PCM

Door-handle openers of the 991 GT2 RS were also deleted.  In the their place are flimsy fabric pull straps.  The buttons running up and down the center console surrounding the gear shifter along the slanted Carrera GT-inspired center console are dummy blanks, instead of functioning buttons.

Once the 991 GT2 RS gets underway, the driver and passenger are teleported back to Porsche’s racing origins.  The exhaust system’s reverberations and the flat-six engine’s guttural rumblings flood the cockpit, a no-no verboten inside the much more civilized non-GT 911 Carreras.

All is a cognitively dissonant mellifluous cacophony felt though your body like haptic ticks and tocks transmitting pleasurable shockwaves ricocheting off and about your viscera.  Ahhh, to feel life lived in a roaring 991.2-gen Porsche GT2 RS.  It’s almost as good as feeling like you’re no longer “just waiting” anymore.

But if you revel in taking long road trips, beware.  You may tire of the racetrack roar of the heavy-metal-cranked-up-to-eleven soundtrack of the 991 GT2 RS — as it is devoid of any sound dampening.

And if you think those Bucket Seats trimmed with carbon-fiber-reinforced backrests and fixed backs may be uncomfortable in rush-hour traffic, then don’t despair.  Keep looking because at the time of release, Porsche offered more comfortable adjustable seats at no extra cost.

Other available seats:

  • 18-way electrically adjustable Sport Seats Plus
  • Bucket seats with folding backrests and shallower bolsters

Other features included:

  • Black leather
  • Carbon-fiber trim
  • Red Alcantara®
  • Sport steering wheel and shift paddles as standard
  • Windows made of lightweight polycarbonate, aka Gorilla Glass

An optional Chrono Package was also available:

  • Integrates with PCM for monitoring lap times
  • Now-familiar analog and digital stopwatch on dashboard
  • Optional lap trigger available through Porsche Tequipment
    • functionality in conjunction with the infrared transmitter as discussed in depth previously above
    • higher level of accuracy and precision for recorded lap times

Performance

As you may know by now if you have perused the discussions above about previous GT models, Porsche is always pushing the envelope of track-worthy performance.  The 991.2-gen Porsche GT2 RS is at the pinnacle of that pursuit.

Here is the GT2 RS by the performance numbers:

  • 0 – 60 mph — 2.7 seconds
  • 0 – 100 mph — 5.8 seconds
  • 0 – 124 mph — 8.3 seconds
  • 1/4 mile — 10.5 seconds
  • 50 – 75 mph — 1.5 seconds
  • Top speed — 211 mph

Suspension

Here are highlights of the suspension features available on the 991.2-gen 911 GT2 RS at the time of new purchase:

  • Ball joints instead of bushings
  • Camber, caster, toe and ride height — all adjustable at individual settings
  • Same PTV Plus electronic locking differential found on other 911 GT-variant Porsche cars
  • Same suspension hardware as the beta-animal 911 GT3 RS, the only difference being the GT2 RS-specific tuned PASM adaptive dampers
  • Suspension coil springs constructed of the same lightweight material found in the Porsche 911 GT3 R racecar
  • Weissach Package available as an option — anti-roll bars:
    • Front and rear carbon-fiber anti-roll bars and end links
    • Adjusted so that their rates are decreased or increased to one’s desire via three assorted mounting points relative to the end links

Transmission

PDK was the only available transmission.  But it does allow for maximum efficiency and uninterrupted torque transfer.

Return to TOC / Outline

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Depicted here is a Lava Orange Porsche 911 GT3 RS, seen from its right side inside a track garage setting. Credit: Porsche AG

Porsche 911 GT3 RS — 991.2-gen — 2019

Overview

The 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS was yet another pride and joy of:

  • Frank-Steffen Walliser, head of Product Line 911 and 718
  • August Achleitner, the retired “Mister 911,” Vice President Product Line 911 and 718, and
  • Andreas Preuninger, Project Manager

As Andreas Preuninger asserted at the time, “The whole Weissach ‘think tank’ [in Flacht] was actively involved” with the development of the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS.  “That’s the reason for the high quantity of carry-over parts.”

Mr. Preuninger also said in reference to testing the 911 GT3 RS, “I love the Nordschleife just as much as I fear it.  No other race track can offer this mix of emotions.”  Well, the 911 GT3 RS has done quite well on the Nordschleife, also notoriously known as the ”Green Hell” as dubbed in awe by legendary World Racing Champion Sir Jackie Stewart.  After all, the 911 GT3 RS scored a record lap time of 6:56.4 at the time.

In fact, over the years the 911 GT3 RS has been the virtual homologation base model for Porsche’s racecars.

Introducing the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS

The beautiful 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS arrived on the scene as a 2019-MY variant.  As all Porschephiles know by heart, any GT3 RS model is the penultimate super-mutant of the 911 trim line, second only to the super-turbo GT2 RS.

This 911 GT3 RS was the third road-legal GT variant introduced within the span of only a year’s time, following the introductions of the notably naturally aspirated 2018 991.2 Porsche 911 GT3 and the 2018 991.2 Porsche 911 GT2 RS.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2019 Model Year (MY) and estimated price of the 991.2 GT3 RS. Source: StuttgartDNA
Source: StuttgartDNA

Among other standard features, the GT3 RS sports cars boasted the following:

  • A mind-blowing naturally aspirated 520-hp(!), 4.0-liter flat-six engine — with an impressive torque of 346 lb.-ft.
    • Increases of 25 hp and 29-lb.-ft. torque, respectively, over the previous model
  • Increased mechanical grip and downforce
  • 66 pounds lighter than the GT3
    • Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) front lid, front wings, rear lid and rear wing
    • Magnesium roof
    • Plastic rear screen and side windows
    • Polyurethane front and rear aprons
    • Lightweight stainless steel sports exhaust system
  • Distinctive 20-inch center-lock wheels, a half-inch wider at all four corners than the previous model, and shod in super-sticky Michelin Pilot Cup 2 tires
  • New suspension specific to the GT3 RS, yielding improved ride quality compared to the GT3’s suspension
  • Newly designed front fenders specific to the GT3 RS, with cutouts bearing slats poised just above the front tires for both brake cooling and reduction of overpressure from the turning front wheels for more downforce
  • NACA air intakes in the “frunk” lid (see StuttgartDNA Sidebar below)
  • Larger, reconfigured rear wing joined to the body on skeletal supports
  • Secondary decklid spoiler below the rear wing
  • Larger splitter at the front beneath the nose

 


StuttgartDNA Sidebar

What are NACA air intakes? 

The engineering of NACA air intakes as a form of low-drag air inlets originated in 1945 through the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the predecessor to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

In specific terms, correctly executed NACA ducts enable air to flow into an internal intake, usually for the purposes of cooling — while maintaining a minimal disturbance to the airflow.

The proof in the pudding is that, after rigorous wind-tunnel testing, the NACA ducts on the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS provide “perfect air acceleration,” according to Peter Varga, Exterior Designer of the 911 GT3 RS. In this way, the NACA ducts supply air and cooling to the GT3 RS’s brakes — with virtually no adverse impact upon drag coefficient.


 

Brakes

The grey cast iron composite brake rotors of 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS featured the following at its variant’s introduction, including its brake system’s brake booster specifically matched to this GT3 RS:

  • Brake rotors
    • 15 inches (380 mm), both front and rear
    • Cast-iron composite
    • Rotor hubs composed of aluminum
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under wet conditions
    • Friction rings composed of gray cast iron
    • Unsprung mass at a minimal 8.8 lbs.
  • Red calipers — enclosed deformation-resistant aluminum monobloc construction, with front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers, and rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers

The optional Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system emerged from Porsche’s motorsport experience and technology.  The exceptionally fade-resistant PCCB brakes of the 911 GT3 RS at the time of introduction featured the following:

  • Brake rotors
    • 1 inches (410 mm) out front
    • 4 inches (390 mm) in the rear
    • Ceramic construction, with a higher concentration of ceramic composition in this iteration than earlier models
    • Bolted on, as opposed to spring mounted
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under wet conditions
    • About 50 percent lighter than standard rotors of similar size — a significant reduction in rotating mass and unsprung weight
  • Yellow calipers — enclosed monobloc construction, which made them both stronger and even more lightweight
    • Front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
    • Rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers

Chassis and Suspension

The engineers in Flacht uniquely designed the chassis and suspension of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS to withstand the brutal, punishing compression and decompression of crashing round a racetrack’s apexes, corners, curbs and rumble strips — over and over and over again.

When introduced, the 911 GT3 RS featured such motorsport-adapted elements as:

  • Lightweight front suspension
  • McPherson-type struts aided by helper springs and longitudinal traverse links
  • Rear axle with multi-link suspension, also with helper springs and a chassis subframe in compliance with the LSA concept (i.e., lightweight, stable and agile)
  • Fully adjustable and fine-tunable camber and caster, as well as adjustable anti-roll bar settings and ride height
  • Reduced roll rates by way of the installation of a softer anti-roll bar
  • Increased ride rates of the springs positioned at both the front and rear axles
  • Damping characteristics ideally tailored to all of the above 911 GT3 RS’s bespoke parameters
  • Ball joints installed in place of all suspension joints for much more agility

The objective of these unique GT3 RS characteristics is the synchronized optimization of stability and traction at cornering speeds exceeding 155 mph (250 kph).

In addition, the following rennsport aspects were designed for — and uniquely tuned to — the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS:

  • Porsche Stability Management (PSM) — in order to maintain steadiness under the most challenging racing scenarios, PSM regulates the following:
    • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
    • Electronic Stability Control (ESC)
    • Traction Control (TC)
  • Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) — Porsche’s active electronic damping system is tuned specifically to the 911 GT3 RS. By the punch of a single button, the driver maintains continuous adjustment for each wheel’s damping force at the following settings for the driver’s desired driving preferences:
    • “Normal” mode — for typical but spirited driving on everyday streets and roads, as well as on damp racetracks
    • “Sport” mode — tuned uniquely for optimal traction on the track in scenarios involving maximum lateral acceleration

(Also see the discussion of the “Chassis and Suspension” under the 991.2 Carrera 2 variants’ section above for a deeper elaboration on the fundamentals behind PASM and rear-wheel steering.)

Click or tap here to access more “Chassis” info in C2 section

  • Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV Plus)
    • Functions in concert with PDK and the fully variable, electronically regulated rear differential lock
    • Applies brake pressure to the inside wheel when cornering
    • Produces more sure-footed traction, more lateral stability and greater driving agility
  • Front-Axle Lift System — available at the time of initial release only as an option
    • Raises front end by 1.18 in. (30 mm)
    • Extends ground clearance, thus avoiding damage to the front fascia and the fascia’s spoiler lip on steep ramps, parking-structure entrances, on uneven road surfaces and over large speed bumps
    • Operates hydraulically, as opposed to pneumatically, thus yielding a weight savings of about 50%

Engine

It bears repeating that this high-revving engine of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS is a monster — a 520-hp, 4.0-liter flat-six engine, with an awesome torque of 346 lb.-ft.  These represent Increases of 20 hp and 29-lb.-ft. torque, respectively, over the previous 911 GT3 RS.

This notably naturally aspirated engine is genetically descended from the thoroughbred powerplants of the 911 GT3, 911 GT3 R, 911 GT3 Cup and 911 RSR racecars.  The high-revving engine redlines at an engine speed of 9,000 rpm.

(Also see discussion of the “Engine” under the 911 GT3 above for further information on the rigid valve drive, etc., as the GT3’s engine and the GT3 RS’s engine are genetically intertwined.)

Here are some of the engine highlights offered when the GT3 RS was introduced at the Geneva Motor Show back in March 2018:

  • Aluminum engine block and cylinder heads
  • Centrifuge inspired by Porsche Motorsport experience that de-foams the oil before transference to the auxiliary oil tank
  • Direct fuel injection (DFI)
  • Dry-sump lubrication with an auxiliary oil tank and seven scavenge pumps returning oil rapidly to the external oil tank
  • Forged titanium connecting rods
  • Four valves per cylinder operated by cam followers
  • Rigid valve train with shims providing valve clearance compensation
  • Six throttle valves providing optimal air supply to each cylinder
  • Variable intake manifold composed of synthetics:
    • Assures efficient gas cycles
    • Produces an extraordinary torque curve
    • Promotes high maximum torque and high power output across the spectrum of engine speeds

Exterior

Aerodynamics and Bodywork

Downforce is very important when it comes to any 911 GT variant.  This is especially true for the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS.  This is key not only in terms of aerodynamics, but also for optimal tire-patch contact, especially when entering and exiting the corners.

As Peter Varga, Exterior Designer, explained at the time of release of the GT3 RS, “Downforce, for example, is considerably more important than the drag coefficient.  Finding the perfect balance between form and function — it’s the special challenge we face with every GT model.”

Downforce for the GT3 RS was provided by the following elements upon introduction of the car while still keeping the drag coefficient as low as possible:

  • Wider front spoiler lip
  • NACA air intakes on the carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) “frunk” lid
    • Supplies air to the brakes with little to no effect on the drag coefficient
    • Their shape was originally developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the forerunner of NASA
  • Black-slatted louvers on the front wings over the wheel arches — increasing brake cooling and reducing overpressure from the turning front wheels, thus creating more downforce
  • Widened sideskirts — creating greater undercarriage surface area, thus increasing downforce even more
  • An additional air intake — providing air to the center radiator as well as generating extra downforce
  • Larger, reconfigured rear wing — painted black and attached to the body via skeletal supports of forged aluminum

The upshot of all of these aerodynamic elements is more than twice the downforce of the 911 GT3 at 124 mph.

The bodywork has been tailored out of lightweight materials just for the 911 GT3 RS, too:

  • Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP)
    • Front trunk (“frunk”) lid
    • Front wings
    • Rear lid
    • Rear wing
    • Miscellaneous interior elements
  • Lightweight polyurethane with hollow glass microspheres and carbon-fiber elements
    • Front fascia
    • Front and rear aprons
  • Lightweight glass with durable fracture and scratch resistance
    • Rear window
    • Rear side windows
  • Magnesium
    • Roof
  • Lightweight stainless steel
    • Sports exhaust system
  • Lightweight aluminum and steel composite
    • Body of the car

Optimal cooling was also designed into the car and its bodywork to prevent any chance of overheating:

  • Large front air intakes styled with grilles in a titanium hue
  • The NACA intakes and two front-wing louvers for supplying air to the brakes and combustion air
  • The central air intake in the front fascia allows greater airflow to the center radiator
  • Two air intake vents on either side of the engine lid, a visual cue distinguishing the 911 GT3 RS from other variants
Exterior Colors

The exterior colors offered at the time of the 911 GT3 RS’s rollout were:

Standard colors
  • Black
  • Guards Red
  • Racing Yellow
  • White
Special colors
  • Crayon
  • GT Silver Metallic
  • Lava Orange
  • Miami Blue
Tires and Wheels

As with the GT3, the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS arrived at Porsche Centers round the world with super-sticky Michelin Pilot Sport 2 UHP (Ultra High Performance) tires (although there were some brand exceptions).  In fact, these specialized tires are unique to the 911 GT3 RS.

“Ultra-High Performance” means that these tires enable high-performance cornering at very high speeds with optimal steering precision and agility at these sizes:

  • Front — 265/35 ZR 20 on 9.5 J x 20-inch wheels
  • Rear — 325/30 ZR 21 on 12.5 J x 21-inch wheels

Consequently, the wider tires and wheels ensure a larger contact patch on both road and track surfaces, optimizing driving control and performance.

Now for the specialized wheels.  Coming standard at the time of the 911 GT3 RS’s introduction, the barely-street-legal sports car’s wheels were forged alloys in an aurum-silver finish.

Also available were wheels in black, as well as wheels in black with decorative pin-striping in the matching body color running the circumference of the wheels.

To some owners’ discontent because of the accompanying hassles associated with wheel changing, the wheels are center locking.  However, in contrast, according to Porsche, these center-locking wheels promote racing pit stop-like rapid wheel changes.  The wheels came with centers in black adorned with the “RS” badging.

Another rationale of their center-locking advantage over five-lug-nut wheels is that they reduce rotating mass.  But I’ll let you do your own cost/benefit analysis whether this rationale is advantageous or not relative to the hassles presented by the high-torque wheel-change issues associated with center locks.

Finally, the 911 GT3 RS came standard with a Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS).  The Tire Pressure Monitoring System issues warnings under both gradual or sudden pressure-loss scenarios.

TPMS also possesses an ingenious Race Circuit mode.  This Race Circuit mode automatically analyzes and compensates for the lower pressure of cold tires at the start of a track stint.

Weissach Package

Porsche’s Motorsport Department came up with this optional Weissach Package for super weight savings on the 911 GT3 RS, an $18,000 option at the time.  This buys you a more powerful engine and reduced weight, intended to yield even faster lap times.

You may recall the original Weissach Package that was a similar weight-saving option on the 918 Spyder supercar.

Here’s how the Weissach Package stacks up (or down, perhaps, in terms of weight savings) based on super-light materials used to construct the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS for a weight reduction of about 13 pounds:

  • Carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) as the composition for the following:
    • Anti-roll bars at front and rear
    • Coupling rods
    • Front lid — carbon-weave finish
    • Roof — carbon-weave finish
    • Steering-wheel trim and gearshift paddles — carbon-weave finish

The large “PORSCHE” logo adorning the rear wing is also a Weissach Package visual cue.

Interior visual cues include:

  • Steering-wheel trim
  • Super-lightweight gearshift paddles composed of CFRP
  • Headrests bearing the Weissach Package logo
  • Defining Weissach Package plaque placed on the cupholder cover
  • Lighter-weight carpeting

Returning to the exterior of the car, one could have ordered optional forged magnesium wheels in a Platinum finish, a $13,000 option, strictly as a pairing with the Weissach Package.  These forged magnesium wheels weigh about 25 pounds less that the wheels that came as standard.

This pairing of the Weissach Package and forged magnesium wheels yields a total car weight at a lissome 3,153 pounds, a savings of almost 40 pounds (18 kg) in contrast with the greater weight of a GT3 RS without the Weissach Package.

(EDITOR’S NOTE:  Because the 911 GT3 RS is the “super-sized” version of the 911 GT3, it would be instructive to also refer to the previous discussion of the 911 GT3, which goes into greater detail than we are able to present in this section.  In this section, we will do our very best to inform you of the specific nuances of the 911 GT3 RS, however.)

Click or tap here to access more info on shared 911 GT3 features

For an additional reference, please also see the previously published StuttgartDNA article, “The new Porsche 991 911 GT3 RS.”

Interior

The interior’s fit and finish is what you would expect in a high-end sports car such as the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Once you slide inside the awesome cockpit, you are greeted with and surrounded by black Alcantara®, black leather and carbon fiber accents in just the right places.  The Alcantara® is found on the A-, B- and C-pillars, seat centers and entire roof liner.

For track-day zealots, at no additional cost the 911 GT3 RS could be ordered with sound-system delete, as well as two-zone climate-control delete.

Airbags and POSIP

The 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS also came fitted standard with state-of-the-art airbags and the Porsche Side-Impact Protection System (POSIP).

The airbags for both the driver and passenger are full-sized.  Both sets of airbags inflate in two stages, dependent upon on the kind and gravity of the actual accident in question.

Then there was the Porsche Side-Impact Protection System (POSIP) introduced at the time.  POSIP came standard as mentioned.  As its name implies, POSIP provides side-impact protection in the form of two side airbags that inflate from either car door.  To wit:

  1. One head airbag on either side inflates in an upward direction from its strategic position within each side door
  2. One thorax airbag on either side inflates from its strategic position within each side door
Clubsport Package

You may be lucky enough in your searches to run across a 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS candidate with the Clubsport Package.  This package was available at no extra cost when the car in question rolled off the production line.

The Clubsport Package offers an extra layer of track-day protection:

  • Steel roll cage in a choice of black or Lizard Green colors bolted down on the bodywork — (NOTE: Roll cages were not available for distribution in North America markets.)
  • Six-point racing harness
  • Two shoulder-belt designs
  • HANS® (Head and Neck Support) device capability
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Battery master switch (sold separately through Porsche Motorsport)
  • Front roll cage add-on (sold separately through Porsche Motorsport)
Instrumentation

Five round instrument dials make up the instrument cluster.   As in every Porsche, the engine clock is front and center.  In this case, the “GT3 RS” logo is branded on the tach’s titanium-shaded face.

Just to the right of the engine clock is the multifunction display.  Some of its views include the following:

  • Lateral and longitudinal acceleration (i.e., g-forces)
  • Engine power
  • Tier Pressure Monitoring (TPM) readings
  • Communication settings
  • Audio settings
  • Navigation system’s current map
Porsche Communication Management (PCM) System

Not unlike that of the 991.2-gen 911 GT3, the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) System on offer for the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS also represented the newest, latest PCM generation.  PCM is the 911 GT3 RS’s “Control Central” for all of your communication, audio and navigational needs.

With its high-resolution 7-inch touchscreen display, PCM facilitates effortless control over all of your in-car infotainment and telephonic functions.  These functions include audio interfaces, mobile-phone connectivity and driver/passenger voice-control command.

PCM includes the Porsche Track Precision app, Online Navigation, Porsche Car Connect, Porsche Connect Plus and mobile phone preparation.

Porsche Track Precision App

The Porsche Track Precision app came standard on both the GT3 and GT3 RS.  This track-day app allows the driver to track driving data on his/her smartphone.  Specifically, the driver can display, record and analyze lapping data.

PCM comes into play vis-à-vis the Porsche Track Precision app by transmitting a precise 10-Hz GPS signal from PCM to a smartphone to compare lap times on the smartphone.  If the optional Chrono Package is available, the lap-comparison function can also be manually triggered through the Chrono Package.

The Porsche Track Precision app also allows you to visually and graphically analyze sector and lap times, as well as compare the current lap time with any desired defined reference lap.  Video analysis is also available, as are circuit and driver profiles and recorded statistics to analyze.

If you wanted to get really anal about it, Porsche Tequipment offered an aftermarket lap trigger device that can be set up at the start/finish line to even more accurately capture lap times and then in turn transmit that data to both PCM and to the smartphone app.

Chrono Package with Performance Display

The Chrono Package with performance display was an available option when the 911 GT3 RS rolled into showrooms.

The optional Chrono Package also provides monitoring through the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) System.  Some of these capabilities include:

  • Comparative analysis of the current lap with last lap as well as previous laps
  • Display lap data
  • Fastest lap time
  • Remaining fuel on board
  • Store and evaluate recorded lap times
Connect Plus Module

This Connect Plus module feature was standard within PCM at the time of the introduction of the 911 GT3 RS.  The Connect Plus module, as its name suggests, provides the pathway for all Internet, Wi-Fi and telephonic connectivity in the sports car.

Here are the Connect Plus module’s major features:

  • The center console’s smartphone compartment:
    • Transfers your mobile phone’s signal to the car’s external antenna
    • Enhances audio reception
    • Saves on your battery charge
  • Contains an LTE telephone module with a SIM car reader:
    • Provides wireless Internet access
    • Optimizes voice quality over your smartphone
  • Enables tablets, smartphones, laptops and any other connectible device to access the Internet within the car — simultaneously, if desired
  • Grants access to almost all available Porsche Connect services and amenities. Please note that some of these services may require subscription and other fees.  As a first, each car arrived with its own integrated SIM card which included its own data allowance.  At the time of offer, the three bundled packages included:
    • Car Connect Services
    • Connect App Services
    • Navigation and Infotainment Services
  • WiFi data package was available from the Porsche Connect Store for creating a WiFi hotspot and for music-streaming functions, or you could use your own SIM card with your own subscription to your mobile network provider
Connect Apps

There were various apps available at the time of original purchase of the 911 GT3 RS, such as:

  • Porsche Car Connect — included Porsche Vehicle Tracking System (PVTS) which features theft detection
  • Porsche Connect — allowed you to send destinations to your car ahead of commencing your trip, as well as stream music from its streaming library
  • Apple® CarPlay — enabled the driver to interface his personal iPhone®, with some of his/her phone apps viewable on the PCM screen; the Siri® voice recognition function was also available

Other apps may now be available.  To see what may be on offer, you can go to www.porsche.com/connect-store to discover what is currently offered.

Stereo System

The PCM System enables audio input from various available sources:

  • AM/FM Radio
  • SD cards
  • CD/DVD drive
  • 10-GB internal hard drive
  • USB connection, such as connectivity via your iPhone®

Not unlike the 911 GT3, the 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS offered two stereo systems at the time; one standard and the other optional:

  • Sound Package Plus System — standard
    • 150 watts
    • 8 speakers
  • Bose® Surround Sound System — optional
    • 555 watts
    • 12 speakers and amplifier channels
    • 100-watt high-performance subwoofer
    • Fully adjustable to optimally tailor any speaker to the acoustics of the car’s interior

Return to the GT3 “PCM” sub-section

Return to the GT2 RS “PCM” sub-section

Steering Wheel

As discussed previously under the 911 GT3, the 918 Spyder-derived GT Sport steering wheel of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS is manually adjustable in both height and length.  The GT Sport steering wheel is upholstered in black Alcantara®, fitted with short-throw shift paddles, and fashioned with a top-center marking at 12 o’clock indicating your straight-forward positioning.

Seats

As with the 911 GT3, the seats of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS could be ordered with three choices of seats.  (Please also see the more detailed discussion of the seats under the 911 GT3 above.)  The choices at the time were the following:

  1. Full Bucket Seats — standard
    • Seat centers in black Alcantara® or optional Lizard Green
    • “GT3 RS” logos on the headrests embroidered in GT Silver
  2. Sports Bucket Seats — optional
    • Backrests fold for ease of access to behind-the-seat area
    • Forward and backward adjustment on both left and right seats
    • Seat shells composed of glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic with a carbon-weave finish
    • Additional lateral and pelvic support resulting from elevated backrest pivot points placed high in the side bolsters
    • Integrated thorax airbag
    • Black-leather upholstery, with seat centers lined in perforated black Alcantara® or optional Lizard Green
  3. Adaptive Sports Seats Plus — optional
    • 18-position electronic adjustment in terms of seat height, four-way lumbar support, squab angle, backrest angle, seat depth, bolster lateral-support adjustment, forward and backward adjustment, etc.
    • Black-leather upholstery on side bolsters, with seat centers lined in perforated black Alcantara® or optional Lizard Green
    • “GT3 RS” logos on the headrests embroidered in GT Silver

Rear seats were excluded from the 911 GT3 RS, a common delete on all GT variants thus reducing weight.  Just beware that child seats cannot be fitted in Full Bucket Seats and Sports Bucket Seats.

Tap or click for more seat info in 911 GT3 section

Performance

As Porsche is wont to do, Porsche AG and the GT Dept. always strive to improve performance numbers.  The 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS is no exception, of course.

Here are the numbers as publicized by Porsche after the debut of the 911 GT 3 RS, which is slightly faster than the 991.1 911 GT3 RS:

  • 0 – 60 mph — 3.0 seconds (0.2 second faster than the 2018 911 GT3 RS with PDK)
  • 0 – 100 mph — 6.9 seconds (0.4 second faster than the 2018 911 GT3 RS with PDK)
  • 0 – 124 mph — 10.6 seconds (0.4 second faster than the 2018 911 GT3 RS with PDK)
  • 1/4 mile — 10.6 seconds (0.4 second faster than the 2018 911 GT3 RS with PDK)
  • 50 – 75 mph — 1.8 seconds
  • Top speed — 193 mph

Transmission

As discussed, the Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) automatic transmission was the only one available when the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 GT3 RS arrived from the factory.

You may recall that, under my analysis above of the GT3’s available transmissions, I called the Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission a “fine-tuned robot.”  To reinforce that sentiment around the time of the 911 GT3’s release, Porsche disseminated literature about the 911 GT3’s PDK asserting, “It shifts faster than you think . . . quite literally.”

This is especially the case for the PDK of the Porsche 991.2-gen 911 GT3 RS, with its variant-specific PDK tuned to this street-legal model.  Seventh gear also possesses a sports ratio engineered for both maximum speed and top speed.

Even manual shifting operates with speed and ease.  The gearshift paddles provide swift tactile haptic shifting.  Like all current and future Porsche racecars, just pull back to upshift, and push forward to downshift.

Upon its debut, this performance-centric 7-speed automatic Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission was blessed with close-ratio gearing for instantaneous shifting as required on the track.  That lightning-quick shifting is even speedier in PDK “Sport” mode.

These short-shift gear changes occur in milliseconds — with continuous, non-stop flow of power.  The result is amazing acceleration over the course of the entire track, from and to the start/finish line.

Perhaps a PDK refresher tutorial is in order to illustrate just how PDK operates with maximum efficiency and performance:

  • PDK consists of two conjoined gearboxes with two clutches (hence the oft-heard references to PDK as “double clutch”)
  • The connection between the two gearboxes and the engine is made up of two independent input shafts, which coordinate the alternating, non-positive connection between the two gearboxes
  • Gear changes occur in the aforementioned milliseconds by virtue of one clutch opening while the other clutch closes simultaneously to make the lightning-fast gear change
  • The Intelligent Shift Program (ISP) provides the logic of electronic transmission control which choreographs the palpable, instantaneous traction-induced upshifts and downshifts on overrun
  • PDK Sport mode runs the process on steroids by producing more aggressive downshifts upon braking and upshift points at higher engine clock speeds

Thus, according to Porsche, PDK increases and thus optimizes performance, acceleration and fuel economy.

Return to TOC / Outline

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Pictured here is the 991.2 Speedster, Heritage, 2019 NY Debut. Credit: Porsche

Porsche 911 Speedster — 991.2-gen — 2019

Overview

Speedster Origins

The first “Speedster” name and models originated in the early Fifties.  Ever since then, Speedsters have been a major part of the Porsche line-up over the last three-quarters of a century.

Speedsters continue to constitute a very important facet of Porsche’s present, and probably its future as well.  This 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster is testament to that fact.  After all, Porsche underscored the Speedster’s import by lowering the curtain on the entire 991.2–gen model line with this Speedster as the very last model of its entire 991 generation.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Seen here is a superlative example of a 1953 356 Porsche America Roadster viewed from the left-front corner. Credit; Porsche AG
1953 356 Porsche America Roadster. Credit: Porsche AG

But the “Speedster” was not born overnight.  It had its origins in something that came before it — the Porsche 356 1500-cc America Roadster.  The America Roadster was a perfect precursor on which to model and mold the Speedster — based on the America Roadster’s Spartan economy of design, peppy engine and its lightweight body and chassis.

Famed European-car distributor Maximilian Edwin Hoffman was the exclusive importer of Porsche sports cars into the U.S. market at the time.  Max Hoffman urged Dr. Ferry Porsche to develop a lightweight, inexpensive Porsche similar to the America Roadster.

Mr. Hoffman’s end goal was to have a new Porsche in his lineup with greater appeal and affordability in the States for the American troops returning home after World War II.  The first Porsche Speedster arrived Stateside in 1952.

The original Speedster sports cars were slated only for the United States market, but eventually sold worldwide.  Their exceptional appeal was not only their light weight, their speed and their easy assembly, but also their Spartan minimalism.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Shown here is a chart indicating the 2019 Model Year (MY) and estimated price of the 991.2 Speedster. Source: StuttgartDNA991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster Debut

There is nothing minimalist, however, about the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster, especially its MSRP of $274,500 plus $1,250 destination fees at the time of first availability.  But to be fair, Porsche did its best to minimize this Speedster’s weigh-in at the scales.  More on that in a moment.

991.2-gen Porsche 911 Buyer Guide: Depicted here is a line-up of the Speedster 991.2 compared with past Speedsters. Credit: Porsche AG
The 991.2-gen Speedster (left) pictured here with previous-generation Speedsters. Credit: Porsche AG

Prior to this model, though, there were 8 different variants by 2010 bearing the “Speedster” moniker.  Here are some of the most notable examples:

  • 1957 356A 1500 GS Carrera GT Speedster
  • 1988 911 Speedster — the very first 911 Speedster
  • 2010 997-gen Speedster — limited to 356 units

Then along came the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster.  It debuted as a concept car in October 2018 at the Paris Motor Show.  This introduction intentionally coincided with, and commemorated, the 70th anniversary of Porsche’s manufacture of its immortal sports cars.

The chassis was derived and tweaked from the chassis of the GT3.  This is fitting because the 911 Speedster represents the very last 991.2 GT model.  Moreover, its body shell comes from the Carrera 4 Cabriolet.  The 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster, in essence then, is a GT3 cabriolet.

Representing the next generation of GT3 and GT3 RS engines, it’s powerplant is a naturally aspirated 4.0-liter flat-six.  Interestingly, Porsche paid homage to Porsche purists by offering only a 6-speed manual transmission — no PDK here.

When the 991.2-gen 911 Speedster arrived on American shores in late 2019, it weighed in at a slender 3,230 pounds.  As just alluded to, Porsche did its best to keep this Speedster as “minimalist” as possible, if only in terms of weight savings.

Unique styling cues set the 911 Speedster apart from its 991 stablemates:

  • Carbon-fiber fenders, engine cover, hood and stone guards
  • Central fuel cap
  • Characteristic hump-shaped double-sided streamliner roof cover
  • Leather interior with perforated seats
  • Red-tinted daytime running lights
  • Shorter, sharper-raked windshield
  • “Talbot” wing mirrors

Curiously, this was the first Speedster conceived by the Porsche Motorsport Department in Weissach.  A total of 1,948 units ran down the production line in commemoration of the year 1948 that Porsche No. 1 obtained its operating license.

Again, sadly the 991.2-gen Speedster was the last ever of the 991 variants.  This marked the end of a technologically rich time and run for the 991 model line.  Like the last generation came to a close with the 911 R, this is Porsche’s sendoff of the 991.2 generation with a similarly equipped 991 Speedster.

Past generations have ended with the Speedster, namely:

  • G Series
  • 964
  • 993 generation, and
  • 997 generation

Brakes

Originating from Porsche’s motorsport technology and experience, the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system came as standard equipment on the 991.2-gen 911 Speedster.  The brake pads came as specially designed pads for this Speedster in order to reduce brake squeal sometimes experienced on previous PCCB systems.

Practically fade-free, the  PCCB brakes of the 911 Speedster featured the following when introduced:

  • Yellow calipers — enclosed monobloc construction, making them both strong, yet more lightweight
    • Front six-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
    • Rear four-piston aluminum monobloc fixed calipers
  • Brake rotors
    • 1 inches (410 mm) out front
    • 4 inches (390 mm) in the rear
    • About 50 percent lighter than standard rotors of similar size — a significant reduction in rotating mass and unsprung weight
    • Bolted on, as opposed to spring mounted
    • Ceramic construction, with a higher concentration of ceramic composition than earlier models
    • Cross-drilled for greater performance under wet conditions

Chassis and Suspension

Porsche designed the 911 Speedster chassis to provide endless driving comfort and stability.  Naturally, developed in Flacht, the chassis is based on the Weissach chassis of the GT3 and GT3 RS models.

The new dynamic engine mounts and specially calibrated rear-axle steering system were customized specifically for the 991.2-gen 911 Speedster.  Again, Porsche wanted to ensure optimal control and stability.

The standard 20-inch center-lock wheels came in Satin Black with Ultra High Performance (UHP) tires similar to the ones listed above under the GT models.  The sizes on offer at the time were 245/35ZR-20 tires up front and 305/30ZR-20 tires in the rear.

Engine

The 991.2-gen 911 Speedster’s naturally aspirated 502-hp powerplant was the next-generation, racing-inspired engine derived from the GT3 and GT3 RS engines at the time.

Among other innovations, the 911 Speedster arrived with redesigned fuel-and air-delivery systems.  Its  engine for the first time employed individual throttle bodies.  This makes for throttle responses that are cleaner and sharper, not unlike the performance of the engine in the 911 GT3 R racecar.

In addition, the advanced fuel injection system produced a higher injection pressure, thus living up to its racing pedigree.  According to Porsche, this paved the way for a 25-percent increase in fuel pressure from the new fuel injection system.  This in turn allows for a much more linear power thrust profile.

So the following numbers should come as no surprise:

  • 502 hp
  • 346 lb-ft of torque
  • 0 to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds
  • Top track speed of 192 mph
  • 9,000 rpm redline

Finally, the titanium exhaust system has a reduced weight of about 22 pounds when compared with the GT3’s exhaust system.

Exterior

Standard Package

All it takes is one look at the car to realize that it is unmistakably a Speedster.  Dead giveaways are the low-cut side windows and chopped, low-raked windscreen.  Both are cut down to emulate Speedsters of yore.

The next visual cues are the manual fabric cabriolet top and the dual “streamliners” composed of carbon fiber at the rear of the car.  Upon closer inspection, it’s plain to see that the streamliners necessitated the deletion of the customary rear child-sized seats of the 911.

The body shell and other exterior components are on the exotic side, even when compared to other 911 variants.  They are constructed of the following:

  • Body shell composed of the sheet metal of the Carrera 4S, interspersed with carbon-fiber composites
  • The hood, rear decklid and front fenders constructed from carbon fiber for even more weight savings — with the rear decklid weighing a mere 22 pounds
  • Front and rear fascia molded in lightweight polyurethane

The cabriolet top is a completely manual affair, except for the locking and unlocking mechanism which is electronically activated.  The top is similar to that of the Boxster Spyder.  It can be stored in the frunk and then manually installed to fend off any eventualities of rain or other inclement weather.

All of these exotic components and features yielded a vehicle that weighed, again, a very light 3,230 pounds, almost 20 pounds lighter than the lightest 991.2 GT3 variant.

Heritage Design Package

Then there was the Heritage Design Package.  Porsche Exclusiv Manufaktur designed the elements of the package.  When ordered at the time of purchase, it came with design touches and styling cues harkening back to the earliest Speedster variants seen in the 1950s.

Some of the Heritage Design styling elements included:

  • The snout, front fenders and doors accented in silver and white graphics
  • A door racing number or no number, as desired
  • Classic Porsche Crests
  • Two-tone leather on the interior
  • Black brake calipers with white “Porsche” script
  • Silver wheels
  • Gold Speedster badges

Oh, and the cost?  A mere $24,510 just for the Heritage Design package alone.

Interior

As stated, one of the hallmarks of design of the 991.2-gen 911 Speedster was drastic weight reduction.  The savings in weight was in fact key to its design.  So it comes as no surprise that weight-saving efforts found their way inside the vehicle too.

Some of these lighter-weight interior elements included:

  • A/C delete (but could be added at no extra cost)
  • Cloth door pulls
  • Lightweight door cards bearing storage nets weighing next to nothing

Other interior features included black-leather seats as standard.

Among just some of the optional features for selection were:

  • Red stitching on the dashboard
  • “Speedster” logo embedded in the seat headrests
  • Red door pulls
  • GT Sport steering wheel adorned with the red 12 o’clock center marker
  • “Speedster” doorsill guards in carbon fiber

Performance

Here are the vital performance numbers of the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster upon rolling off the assembly-hall floor:

  • 0 – 60 mph — 3.5 sec
  • 0 – 100 mph — 7.6 sec
  • 1/4 mile — 11.7 sec
  • Top speed — 193 mph

Transmission

As discussed, the 991.2 Speedster came with one transmission, a GT Sport 6-speed manual transmission only.  Interestingly, it was a 6-speed gearbox, contrary to the usual 7-speed trannies that previous Carreras had.

It was said at the time that this 911 Speedster transmission was a slimmer, more efficient transmission than the 7-speed example.   It was also a similar 6-speed trannie to that of the 911 R.

It saves approximately 9 pounds relative to the typical 7-speed manual transmission, and almost 40 pounds lighter than the PDK transmission.

Return to TOC / Outline

991-gen Porsche 911 Concluding Thoughts

Common 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Problems and Issues

Porsche has made fleshing out this section very easy for me.  How’s that, you say?  Well, Porsche has designed and constructed it 991.2-gen model variants virtually problem free.  So there’s very little for me to write about here, as opposed to other previous generations of the Porsche 911.

Porsche did issue some recalls previously.  Here are some of the rare examples:

  1. Exhaust problem on vehicles with high mileage
  2. Faulty fuel-pipe connectors
  3. Faulty hood latches

Cooling System

I elaborated on the 991.1’s advanced cooling system above under the Carrera 2 section at the top of this Buyer Guide.  The system was designed to eke out greater fuel mileage and lower CO2 emissions.

This was a great idea in principle, but it opened a whole new can of worms in terms of creating greater potential for problems and breakdowns and a greater need for repairs.  This is because of the system’s required complicated sequence of vacuum-controlled electropneumatic valves needed to circulate the engine’s coolant around the engine, transmission and heater core.

Hence the increased potential and probability that these additional moving parts could malfunction from wear and tear to which they are subjected.  So beware of future cooling-system breakdowns and the need for repairs.

These are the most blatant problems and issues to arise in the recent past.  However, as more mileage is clocked on these 991.2 Porsche 911 cars, I will update and document problems or issues, if any, in this article that arise over time in the future.

Engine Recall Only for the 991.1-gen 911 GT3

The  good news about the engine of 991.2-gen 911 GT3 is that it is awesome as I illustrated above.

However, such good news about any subject will always be balanced or exceeded by bad news.  Well, the incredible Porsche GT3 is no exception.

To wit, out of the blue, two 991.1-gen GT3 engines blew up in flames in Europe, to the utter consternation of Porsche AG.  The GT3 sports cars in question simply caught fire, going up in smoke.  Who’da thunk it!

As usual, Porsche AG stepped up to the plate and rectified the situation.  The model year in question is the 2014 991.1 Porsche 911 GT3.  Porsche launched a campaign to inspect all 785 GT3 engines from that model year delivered around the world.

The company contacted all such owners, warning them to cease driving their cars immediately.  Furthermore, Porsche offered to pick up and flatbed all cars to a Porsche dealership.

Anyway, Porsche conducted a thorough analysis of the situation.  The company determined that engine damage was the direct result of a faulty loosened screw joint fitted on the connecting rod.  This unsecured connecting rod damaged the crankcase, which in turn caused leakage of oil then — Poof! went the oil in flames.

To remedy the problem, Porsche replaced all 785 engines with ones altered with optimized screw fittings.  Additionally, 2014 model-year GT3s that hadn’t been delivered also received these replacement engines.  There have not been any such fiery problems since this radical recall.

Return to GT3 “Engine” sub-section

Fond Farewells to the 991.1 and 991.2 Porsche 911

The 991 generation of Porsche 911 cars enjoyed a great run, beginning in 2011 with the 991.1-gen Porsche 911 Carrera and Carrera S, and ending in 2019 with the 991.2-gen Porsche 911 Speedster.  All told, a total of 233,540 991-gen units rolled out of the Porsche’s assembly halls.

As mentioned in the previous section, the 991.2-gen Speedster was not only the last 991 ever produced, but also the last 991-gen GT car.

In fact, the very last 991.2-gen Speedster was destined for American shores, where it arrived in late 2019.  It rolled off the assembly line on December 20, 2019.  This 991.2-gen Speedster was auctioned off by RM Sotheby’s for a charitable cause in April 2020.  The winning bid was $550,000.  All proceeds were slated to contribute to the fight against COVID-19.

So, farewell to the amazing 991 generation of Porsche 911 sports cars.  What a heck of a run it was.  And so begins the start of a new generation of Porsche 911 models, the 992 generation of Porsche 911 cars.  As soon as possible, we will publish our next StuttgartDNA Buyer Guide on the 992 stable of Porsche 911 sports cars.

Return to TOC / Outline

© 2021 Copyright Larry Domasin / StuttgartDNA.com.  All Rights Reserved.


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